Managing American Wildlife: A History of the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

By Dian Olson Belanger | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Chronology of Major Developments in the History of Fish and Wildlife Management
1629 The West India Company granted hunting privileges to persons plant-
ing colonies in New Netherlands.
1647 Massachusetts Bay colonial ordinance contained provisions regarding the "right of hunting."
1694 Massachusetts established the first closed season on deer.
1708 The first closed season on birds was designated, in certain New York
counties, for heath hen, grouse, quail, and turkey.
1739 Massachusetts established the first game warden system. New York
followed in 1741.
1776 The first federal game law required closed seasons on deer in all
colonies except Georgia.
1782 The bald eagle became recognized as the national emblem.
1789 The U.S. Constitution established federal authority over treaty mak-
ing, federal land policy, and interstate commerce. It did not specifi-
cally mention wildlife, but these provisions have been cited ever since
in matters of jurisdiction over various wildlife issues.
1802 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was formed.
1812 General Land Office was established within the Department of the
Treasury to administer sales and surveys of public land.
1818 Massachusetts enacted the first law protecting nongame birds, declar-
ing a closed season on larks and robins.
1832 The United States established its first national park, in Hot Springs,
Arkansas.
1836 The Bureau of Indian Affairs was established.
May 20, 1844 The New York Sportmen's Club, the first conservation organization in
the United States, met for the first time in New York City. In 1873 it
became the New York Association for the Protection of Game.

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