Skull Wars: Kennewick Man, Archaeology, and the Battle for Native American Identity

By David Hurst Thomas | Go to book overview

14.
WHERE ARE ALL THE NATIVE AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGISTS?

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, the first President inaugurated in the twentieth century, was described by one historian as "the archetypical 'good guy,' combining the best of the inherited English tradition of gentlemanly honor with a riproaring taste for adventure which is quintessentially American." With his Tiffany silver Bowie knife, fringed buckskin shirt, and alligator boots, Roosevelt managed to combine an aristocratic style with a no-nonsense image of frontier America. In the first volume of The Winning of the West ( 1889), he warned the sentimentalists that the Indians had no real title to America because they had never effectively occupied the land. It was unthinkable to Roosevelt that America's grasslands and forests be withheld from civilized homesteaders by the claims of a few savages. Roosevelt's Indians were a treacherous and brutal lot, and he told chilling tales of "the hideous, unnameable, unthinkable tortures practiced by the red men on their captured foes." It was the long-suffering frontiersman, Roosevelt reminded Americans, who had been wronged," . . . a stern race of freemen who toiled hard, endured greatly, and fronted adversity bravely, who prized strength and courage and

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skull Wars: Kennewick Man, Archaeology, and the Battle for Native American Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.