Skull Wars: Kennewick Man, Archaeology, and the Battle for Native American Identity

By David Hurst Thomas | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

IT IS MY pleasure to acknowledge the assistance of those who helped with Skull Wars.

I am particularly grateful to that Sioux trickster Vine Deloria, Jr., for his detailed review of the manuscript and for contributing the Foreword. Although Vine and I disagree on many, many things, our disagreements remain cordial--partly because of the mutual trust developed over a decade of debate and dialogue, and also because we are both deeply disturbed by the chasm that continues to separate western science from Indian America. Each of us, in different ways, is trying to bridge that chasm.

I also thank James Chatters for his openness and willingness to spend hours working with me on this manuscript. The Kennewick experience has been extraordinarily difficult for Chatters, and, with Jim's help, I have tried to get beyond the media's distorted representations of the Kennewick affair. I have known Chatters for three decades; he's a first rate archaeologist. Although we sometimes view things differently, I sincerely hope that Jim feels he has been fairly treated here.

It has been my great privilege to work with William Frucht of Basic Books; more than once, Bill's editorial skill and encouragement carried the day. Kenneth David Burrows provided expert guidance throughout.

-277-

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