A Pictorial Treasury of Opera in America

By Daniel C. Blum | Go to book overview

A Pictorial Treasury of Opera in America

by Daniel Blum

Greenberg Publisher New York

-1-

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A Pictorial Treasury of Opera in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Acknowledgements 2
  • Early Years of Opera in America 5
  • L'' Africaine 10
  • Aida 12
  • Alceste 22
  • L''Amore Dei Tre Re (the Love of Three Kings) 24
  • La Boheme 26
  • The Barber of Seville 32
  • Boris Godunov 38
  • Carmen 42
  • Cavalleria Rusticana 52
  • Cosi Fan Tutte 54
  • The Daughter of the Regiment 56
  • Don Carlos 58
  • Don Giovanni 60
  • Don Pasquale 66
  • Elektra 68
  • L'' Elisir D'' Amore 70
  • Falstaff 72
  • Faust 76
  • Fidelio 87
  • Die Fledermaus 88
  • The Flying Dutchman 90
  • La Forza del Destino - (The Force of Destiny) 92
  • Gianni Schicchi 96
  • La Gioconda 98
  • Gotterdammerung 102
  • Hansel Und Gretel 106
  • Herodiade 108
  • Les Huguenots 110
  • Lohengrin 118
  • Louise 124
  • Lucia Di Lammermoor 128
  • Madame Butterfly 134
  • The Magic Flute 140
  • Manon 144
  • Manon Lescaut 150
  • Marriage of Figaro 152
  • Martha 156
  • The Masked Ball 158
  • Mefistofele 160
  • Die Meistersinger 162
  • Mignon 166
  • Norma 170
  • Orfeo Ed Euridice 172
  • Otello 174
  • I- Pagliacci 180
  • Parsifal 184
  • Pelleas et Melisande 190
  • Ibbetson 194
  • Le Prophète 195
  • Das Rheingold 196
  • Rigoletto 198
  • Romeo and Juliette 206
  • Der Rosenkavalier 212
  • Salome 218
  • Samson et Dalila 222
  • Siegfried 228
  • Simon Boccanegra 232
  • The Tales of Hoffmann 234
  • Tannhauser - Music and Libretto by Richard Wagner 238
  • Thais 246
  • Tosca 250
  • La Traviata 258
  • Tristan Und Isolde 264
  • II- Trovatore 272
  • Die Walkure 276
  • Other Operas 284
  • Opera Houses in America 309
  • Index 318
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