LIFE
ON THE MISSISSIPPI

BY
MARK TWAIN

(Samuel L. Clemens)

Illustrated

Harper & Brothers
Edition

Published By
P. F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY
New York

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Life on the Mississippi
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • The "Body of the Nation" *
  • The River and Its History 1
  • The River and Its Explorers 10
  • Frescos from the Past 17
  • The Boys' Ambition 32
  • I Want to Be a Cub-Pilot 38
  • A Cub-Pilot's Experience 44
  • A Daring Deed 54
  • Perplexing Lessons 63
  • Continued Perplexities 72
  • Completing My Education 81
  • The River Rises 89
  • Sounding 98
  • A Pilot's Needs 107
  • Rank and Dignity of Piloting 118
  • The Pilots' Monopoly 127
  • Racing Days 143
  • Cut-Offs and Stephen 153
  • I Take a Few Extra Lessons 163
  • Brown and I Exchange Compliments 171
  • A Catastrophe 177
  • A Section in My Biography 185
  • I Return to My Muttons 186
  • Traveling Incognito 196
  • My Incognito is Exploded 200
  • From Cairo to Hickman 208
  • Under Fire 216
  • Some Imported Articles 225
  • Uncle Mumford Unloads 231
  • A Few Specimen Bricks 242
  • Sketches by the Way 252
  • A Thumb-Print and What Came of It 262
  • The Disposal of a Bonanza 281
  • Refreshments and Ethics 287
  • Tough Yarns 293
  • Vicksburg During the Trouble 296
  • The Professor's Yarn 305
  • The End of "The Gold Dust" 314
  • The House Beautiful 316
  • Manufactures and Miscreants 324
  • Castles and Culture 332
  • The Metropolis of the South 339
  • Hygiene and Sentiment 344
  • The Art of Inhumation 349
  • City Sights 354
  • Southern Sports 363
  • Enchantments and Enchanters 373
  • Uncle Remus" and Mr. Cable 379
  • Sugar and Postage 382
  • Episodes in Pilot Life 391
  • The "Original Jacobs" 398
  • Reminiscences 405
  • A Burning Brand 414
  • My Boyhood Home 427
  • Past and Present 434
  • A Vendetta and Other Things 445
  • A Question of Law 453
  • An Archangel 461
  • On the Upper River 469
  • Legends and Scenery 477
  • Speculations and Conclusions 486
  • Appendix 497
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