African Women: A Modern History

By Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch; Beth Gillian Raps | Go to book overview
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Aba, 153 politicized women in, 163-165
Aba Women's Association, 165
Abayomi, Oyinkan Morenike, 152, 153 160, 168
Abeokuta, 55 politicized women in, 169-172, 257(n16), 257(n22)
Abeokuta Ladies' Club, 169
Abeokuta Women's Union (AWU), 169-172, 257(n22)
Abidjan, 103, 226 AIDS in, 128 child labor in, 115 prostitution in, 128 women's march on, 177-179, 258(n36) See also specific peoples
Abo, Léonie, 186-187
Abomey. See Benin
Abraham, Liz, 132, 192
Accra, 90 and marriage, 19, 237(n25) child labor in, 115 market women in, 95, 96 prostitution in, 127 See also specific peoples
Achebe, Chinua, 227
Action Group, 123, 168, 172, 173-174
Adandozan, 37
Addis Ababa and businesswomen, 105 and genital mutilation, 209 and migration, urban, 82, 246(n36)
Adekogbe, Elizabeth Adeyemi, 173
Ademola, 169, 170, 172, 257(n22)
Aetius, 207
AFCO. See Association des Femmes Commerçantes
Africa (eastern) and farmers, women, 71 and land access, 65-68 and women chiefs, 36
Africa (southern) and subjugation of women, 56 powerful women in, 39-50
Africa (western) and land access, 68-69 female factory workers in, 134 genital mutilation in, 206
African Democratic Assembly, 158
African Methodist Episcopal church, 191
African National Congress (ANC), 48, 189-195, 230
African Yearly Register, 150
Afrikaners, 28
Afro-Brazilian women, 51, 55 and women's rights, 83
Agonglo, King (Danxhomé), 37
Agricultural hierarchy, 59-64
AIDS, 125, 217 and contraception, 223 and prostitution, 128
Aisa Kill Ngirmaramma, Queen, 37
Ajasa, Sir Akitoye, 254(n23)
Akan, 178 and divorce, 221 and market women, 94, 95, 97, 103 and marriage, 237(n26) and polygamy, 213 and women's rights, 84, 85, 246(n46)
Ake: The Years of Childhood( Soyinka), 161
Akengbuwa (chief of the Itsekiri kingdom), 37
Akitoye, 55
Alaga, Alhaja Humani, 174, 257(n29)

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