America's Future Work Force: A Health and Education Policy Issues Handbook

By Carl W. Stenberg; William G. Colman | Go to book overview
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"Lack of significant improvement in teacher job satisfaction;
Resistance by teachers, principals, and unions to efforts to restructure teaching, reward superior teachers, and replace the concept of the "shopping mall high school";
A significant and alarming gap between the academic achievement of white, compared with black and Hispanic, students;
Continued high dropout rates, especially for minority and other at-risk students; and
Increasing crime and violence at the school site, especially in inner cities, affecting both students and teachers.

From this chapter it is clear that the nation's public school systems have a long way to go to respond adequately to challenges posed by the needs and deterrents. The issues involved are complex, and many of the options for dealing with them are costly, sometimes controversial, or both. There are no panaceas, "quick fixes," or "one best way" here. The next chapter covers these issues, experiments, and policy options that the public and private sectors could address in order to support and strengthen the efforts by schools to prepare our work force better for the workplace of the future.


NOTES
1
Osborne, D., and Gaebler, T., Reinventing Government: How the Entrepreneurial Spirit Is Transforming the Public Sector (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1992), 314.
2
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics: 1991 ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991), 12.
3
U.S. Department of Labor, Commission on Workforce Quality and Labor Market Efficiency, Investing in People ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, September 1989), 22, 28-32; Johnson, W., and Packer, A., Workforce 2000: Work and Workers for the 21st Century ( Indianapolis: Hudson Institute, June 1987), 113.
4
U.S. Department of Commerce, Statistical Abstract of the United States 1991 ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991), 134.
5
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Projections of Education Statistics to 2002 ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, December 1991), 5. For detailed information on private schools see U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Private Schools in the United States: A Statistical Profile, with Comparisons to Public Schools ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, February 1991).
6
U.S. Department of Education, Projections of Education Statistics to 2002, 95.
9
Ibid., 58; U. S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, 1988 Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1988).
10
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics: 1992 ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992), 15.

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