CHAPTER XIV
The American Pattern in Social Welfare
Government and voluntary, acting in parallel,
sometimes competing,
Taxes and pledges, dollars in tandem,
vastly extensive,

Giving in secret, giving through churches,
Organizations, heady publicity,
Salaried employees, technical programs.
Service to others.
Service to God.

Patterns emerging, solidification,
Trust funds, foundations; unity, diversity.
No turning back ( but longing for old days).
Urbanization.
Big population.
Structuring needs never dreamed of before.

Social insurance—pay for the trip in advance!
Public assistance—no one must starve!
Voluntary organizations.Fund-raising. Planning.
Personal doing of good.
Social welfare; an American pattern,
Federal, local; complicated, simple.
Service to others.
Service to God.

CHANGE HAS BEEN THE GENERAL RULE in twentieth-century America.Our people have accepted this and come to live with it. The temptation is great when studying and writing about any aspect of life in these fluid years to say, in effect, "there was the great change." Books on science say this; so, too, volumes on industrial relations, on communications, on warfare, and on literature. Nothing escapes this tendency.

One of the most significant changes in social welfare, beyond any doubt, was the vast multiplication of welfare organizations serving the needy. This phenomenon was apparent at the national, state, and local levels alike. The building of voluntary organizations sufficient in extent to be household words in every

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