Conservatives in An Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations

By James Reichley | Go to book overview

Foreword

THE LATE Arthur Okun once wrote: "Nobody comes out of graduate school with a Ph.D. in priority setting or applied ideology. And yet these are major tasks in the executive's policymaking." The effects of ideology on policymaking in American government have been little studied--partly because many scholars have either dismissed the importance of ideology in American politics, or have held that almost universal agreement on a common "liberal" ideology has muted ideological dispute.

In this book A. James Reichley, a Brookings senior fellow, argues that there is a distinguishable tradition of conservative ideology in American political history, and he examines its effects on policy formulation in the administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Building on James L. Sundquist's critical analysis of policy formulation, Politics and Policy: The Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson Years ( Brookings 1968), Reichley's book studies the role of ideology in the deliberations and debates that led to positions taken by the Nixon and Ford administrations in foreign, economic, and social policy. Since the effect of ideology cannot be assessed in isolation, this book also deals with some of the personal rivalries and ambitions, partisan drives, economic interests, and national and international problems and challenges that influenced policymaking under Nixon and Ford.

The author is particularly grateful to his Brookings colleagues, Martha Derthick and James Sundquist, who provided advice and encouragement from the time the study began until it was finished and, for helpful comments and suggestions on the manuscript, to Joel

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservatives in An Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 482

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.