An Unwanted War: The Diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898

By John L. Offner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
FAILURE
OF CUBAN
REFORMS

At the start of December, Spanish-American relations were cordial and promising. When Congress convened, McKinley treated Sagasta's Cuban reforms favorably in his annual state of the union message. But six weeks later the outlook had changed completely. The root of the problem was the failure of autonomy to win support in Cuba. The island was threatening to descend into anarchy, which would require American military intervention. McKinley devoted one-third of his annual message to Cuba, and he spoke to each of his audiences -- the Spanish, Cubans, and Republican legislators. The president located the origins of the conflict in the Cuban desire for "liberty and self-control." Yet the Cubans carried on a cruel war. McKinley praised autonomy and sought an early end to the war through a peace "just and honorable alike to Spain and the Cuban people! The president drew a sharp distinction between the regime of Cánovas-Weyler and that of Sagasta-Blanco. The rebellion in Cuba had

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An Unwanted War: The Diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 the Cuban Revolution Three Perspectives 1
  • Chapter 2 Cuba, Cleveland, and CÁnovas 17
  • Chapter 3 Mckinley and CÁnovas 37
  • Chapter 4 the Woodford Mission 54
  • Chapter 5 Sagasta's Cuban Reforms 68
  • Chapter 6 Failure of Cuban Reforms 86
  • Chapter 7 Two Shocks the De LÔme Letter and the Maine Disaster 111
  • Chapter 8 Backdrop for Diplomacy 127
  • Chapter 9 Failure to Solve the Crisis 143
  • Chapter 10 Spanish Suspension of Hostilities 159
  • Chapter 11 Descent into War 177
  • Chapter 12 Preliminaries to Peace 194
  • Chapter 13 the Peace Protocol 209
  • Chapter 14 Conclusion 225
  • Appendix 237
  • Notes 239
  • Bibliography 279
  • Index 297
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