Art of the Florida Seminole and Miccosukee Indians

By Dorothy Downs | Go to book overview

Illustrations
Map. Seminole and Miccosukee reservations, 19944
Figures
1.1. Tomo Chachi Mico or King of Yamacraw and Tooanahowi, 173418
1.2. Mico Chlucco the Long Warrior, or King of the Siminoles, 179127
1.3. Front view of hide hunting coat, 1830s 30
1.4. Tuskatche Mico, or the Birdtail King of the Cusitahs, 179032
1.5. Men's dress styles and essential elements of clothing through the years 33
2.1. Seminole Chief Tukose Emathla, prior to 182643
2.2. Doctor's coat with appliqué decoration, early twentieth century44
2.3. The Nation Robbing an Indian Chief of His Wife, 183949
2.4. Seminole dance, drawing by Hamilton Wilcox Merrill, 183850
2.5. N.W. View of Fort Mellon, 183752
2.6. Osceola, painting by George Catlin, 183854
2.7. Seminole woman, painting by George Catlin, 183855
2.8. "Billy Bowlegs" and His Suite of Indian Chiefs in New York, 185261
2.9. Billy Bowlegs in New York, daguerreotype, 185261
2.10. Mrs. Billy Bowlegs, Harper's Weekly, June 12, 185865
2.11. Woman with ox cart, late nineteenth century70

-ix-

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Art of the Florida Seminole and Miccosukee Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Evolution of Early Dress 10
  • Chapter 2 Nineteenth-Century Dress 36
  • Chapter 3 Twentieth-Century Dress: Patchwork 83
  • Chapter 4 Fingerweaving 120
  • Chapter 5 Beadwork 132
  • Chapter 6 Shoulder Bags 152
  • Chapter 7 Silverwork 179
  • Chapter 8 Basketry 194
  • Chapter 9 Dools 211
  • Chapter 10 Pottery 220
  • Chapter 11 Men's Work: Village Construction and Wood Carving 229
  • Bibliography 273
  • Index 284
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