Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa

By Roland Oliver | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
TWENTY-ONE YEARS

Harry johnston was born in London on June 12th 1858. He had two older step-brothers from his father's first marriage, and was himself the eldest of twelve children born from the second. His father, John Johnston, was the well-to-do Secretary of a large insurance company, a shrewd, well-informed, widely travelled man of business, whose work took him regularly all over Western Europe and Scandinavia, and occasionally as far afield as Russia, Asia Minor and South Africa. He had some property besides his emoluments, so that despite the size of the family the Johnstons lived comfortably in a series of large suburban houses on the fringes of south-east London. There was leisure for some cultivated interests; there were regular holidays in the country and by the sea.

More than most Victorians of the middle class, the Johnstons were aware of the revolution in communications which was making the world smaller and bringing its remotest corners within the commanding influence of industrial Europe. John Johnston's professional life was intimately linked with the consequences of the opening up by railways and steamships and telegraphs of Australia and South America, Siberia and the United States. In his spare time he was an active member of the Royal Geographical Society. He was deeply read in the literature of African exploration and had followed with understanding as well as enthusiasm the journeys of Dr Livingstone. He knew more accurately than most Englishmen the location of Khartoum or Candahar. Yet all this breadth of outlook, all this competence in material things, was bounded and interwoven with a strange theology which dominated and determined his domestic life. He and Esther Hamilton, his second wife, were both second-generation members of the Catholic Apostolic Church, a body founded in 1831 in London by a Presbyterian minister, Edward Irving, and a Scottish banker, Henry Drummond. Deeply influenced by the Eastern Orthodox as well as by Roman Catholic usages, the liturgy and ritual of the `Irvingites' had an exotic flavour not wholly inconsistent with the cosmopolitan commercial interests of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xi
  • Plates xiii
  • Drawings in Text *
  • Maps in Text *
  • Chapter 1 Twenty-One Years 1
  • Chapter 2 Angola and the Congo 18
  • Chapter 3 the Mountain with the Unrememberable Name 52
  • Chapter 4 a Resolute but Singularly Lawless Personage 89
  • Chapter 5 Worse on Land Than at Sea 124
  • Chapter 6 a Frightful Menagerie 173
  • Chapter 7 King Johnston Over the Zambezi 197
  • Chapter 8 a Most Valuable Life 245
  • Chapter 9 a Little Disenchanted with Imperialism 272
  • Chapter 10 the God-Given Task of Subduing the Earth 287
  • Chapter 11 Twenty-Six Years 338
  • Location of Manuscript Sources 358
  • Index 359
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.