Perspectives on Learning Disabilities: Biological, Cognitive, Contextual

By Robert J. Sternberg; Louise Spear-Swerling | Go to book overview

1
Genes, Environment, and Reading Disabilities

Richard K. Olson

First, what is the nature (cause or causes) of learning disabilities? The answer to this initial organizing question for the book is addressed in this chapter from a behavioral-genetic perspective on reading disability. It will be shown that reading disability often tends to run in families. More compelling evidence from identical and fraternal twins shows that the familial pattern of transmission is due to both genetic factors and sharedfamily environment. Second, how are reading disabilities most effectively diagnosed? This question is addressed from both a behavioral-genetic and medical-genetic perspective. It will be shown that some component skills in reading have stronger genetic influences than others and that the degree of genetic influence may vary depending on characteristics such as disabled readers' IQs, phonological decoding, and age. Current evidence from analyses of disabled readers' DNA suggests the future use of genetic markers and ultimately specific genes for the early diagnosis of risk for reading disability. Third, how are reading disabilities most effectively remediated, and to what extent is remediation possible? It will be strongly argued that evidence for genetic influence, even very strong genetic influence in some cases, should not discourage our best efforts in remediation. However, the genetic evidence and results from training studies suggest that some extraordinary environmental intervention may be needed for many disabled readers.

____________________
The research reported from the Colorado twin and computer-remediation projects was supported by NICHD grant Nos. HD 1 1683 and HD 22223.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on Learning Disabilities: Biological, Cognitive, Contextual
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.