Perspectives on Learning Disabilities: Biological, Cognitive, Contextual

By Robert J. Sternberg; Louise Spear-Swerling | Go to book overview

4
Learning Disabilities in Perspective

Richard K. Wagner Tamara Garon

Without question, this is a time of remarkable progress in understanding the nature of learning disabilities in general and of reading disabilities in particular. Researchers appear to be converging on possible genetic loci of a common form of specific reading disability. The results of longitudinal studies of reading acquisition make it possible to identify children at risk for the development of reading disabilities with considerable accuracy and then to begin interventions even prior to the onset of reading instruction. The excitement at conferences devoted to reading disabilities is nearly palpable.

The purpose of this chapter is to attempt to place this progress in perspective and to consider its implications for an account of learning disabilities. We begin by considering competing analogies and perspectives that seek to define the fundamental nature of reading disability. Next we review several behavioral markers of learning disabilities that have been widely held previously. Then we turn to a discussion of the behavioral marker that is the cause of much of the recent excitement, namely, a deficit in phonological processing. Finally, we discuss implications of research on phonological processing for understanding the nature of reading disabilities and for application of this understanding to diagnosis and treatment.


Which Is the Better Analogy: Obesity or Dwarfism?

On any given day, we come across people of varying weights and heights. Occasionally, we encounter individuals who fall outside the norm in weight, height, or both.

Dwarfism is a genetically transmitted condition in which the inability to produce a sufficient amount of growth hormone results in atypically

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on Learning Disabilities: Biological, Cognitive, Contextual
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.