Reference Guide to Russian Literature

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A

Fedor Aleksandrovich Abramov 1920-1983
Novelist and short-story writer

Biography

Born in Verkola, z9 February 1920. Attended secondary school in Karpogora; studied philology at Leningrad State University, from 1938; completed degree at Leningrad State University after demobilization, 1945-48; postgraduate study and dissertation on Mikhail Sholokhov's Podniataia tselina ( Virgin Soil Upturned) and the theme of collectivization, 1951. Enrolled in the artillery division of the Soviet Army: seriously wounded, 1941; after a long period of convalescence, worked as political instructor in Archangel and then senior investigator in the counter-espionage section of the army (SMERSH), 1942-45: decorated. Lecturer, then senior lecturer in the department of Soviet literature at Leningrad State University, 1951-55. Member of the Writers' Union, 1960; full-time writer from 1962. Married: Liudmila Vladimirovna Krutikova in 1976. Recipient: State Prize for Literature, 1975. Died in Leningrad, 14 May 1983.


Publications

Collected Editions

Sobranie sochinenii, 3 vols. Leningrad, 1980-82.

Swans Flew by and Other Stories. Moscow, Raduga, 1986.

Sobranie sochinenii. Leningrad, 1990 — (3 vols to date)


Fiction

"Brat'ia i sestry" [ Brothers and Sisters], Neva, 9 ( 1958), 3-142.

"Vokrug da okolo" [ Round and About], Neva, I ( 1963), 109-37.

" Dve zimy i tri leta", Novyi mir, I ( 1968), 3-67; translated as "Two Winters and Three Summers", by D.B. and D. C. Powers, Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1984; also translated by Jacqueline Edwards and Mitchell Schneider, San Diego, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1984.

" Pelageia", Novyi mir, 6 ( 1969), 31-70.

" Al'ka", Nash sovremennik, I ( 1972) 2-36.

"Dereviannie koni" [Wooden Horses], in Povesti i rasskazy, Leningrad, 1972.

"Puti-pereput'ia" [ Roads and Crossroads], Novyi mir, I-2 ( 1973), 3-114; 5-58.

"Dom" [ The House], Novyi mir, 12 ( 1978), 3-164.

"Mamonikha", in Babilei: Rasskazy. Povesti, Leningrad, 1981.

"Poezdka v proshloe" [ The Journey into the Past], Novyi mir, 5 ( 1989), 5-38.

"Kto on?" [ Who is He?], Znamia, 3 ( 1993), 140-60.


Essay

"Liudi kolkhoznoi derevni v poslevoennoi proze" [ People of the Collectivized Village in Post-War Soviet Literature], Novyi mir, 4 ( 1954), 210-31.


Critical Studies

A History of Post-War Soviet Writing: The Literature of Moral Opposition, by Grigori Svirski, edited and translated by Robert Dessaix and Michael Ulman, Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1981.

Scenes from Soviet Life: Soviet Life Through Official Literature, by Mary Seton-Watson, London, BBC Publications, 1986.

Fedor Abramov: Lichnost'. Knigi. Sud'ba, by I. Zolotusskii, Moscow, 1986.

Fedor Abramov, by A. Turkov, Moscow, 1987.

Dom v Verkole, by L. Krutikova, Leningrad, 1988.

Dom na Ugore: o Fedore Abramove i ego knigakh, by Iu. Oklianskii, Moscow, 1990.

The Life and Work of Fedor Abramov, edited by David Gillespie , Evanston, Illinois, Northwestern University Press, 1997.


Bibliography

Bibliograficheskii ukazatel', edited by V. V. Moshareva, A. N. Rychkova and Archangel, 1993.

Fedor Aleksandrovich Abramov was a respected writer associated with the movement of Russian Village Prose. The youngest son of a large peasant family, he was born in the village of Verkola in the north of Russia where he experienced the culture and life that forms the basis of his fiction. Before launching his literary career, he worked as an academic and a specialist in Soviet literature, but his name first became widely known in 1954 with the publication of a controversial article in the journal Novyi mir.

In "Liudi kolkhoznoi derevni v poslevoennoi proze" [ People of the Collectivized Village in Post-War Soviet Literature], Abramov condemns the falsified depiction of rural life characteristic of Soviet novels, a criticism that earned him a reputation for outspokenness and caused the journal to be censured. Four years later, Abramov established himself as a writer with the publication of his first work of fiction, the novel Brat'ia i sestry [ Brothers and Sisters], the first part of the tetralogy known under the collective name Brat'ia i sestry as well as Priasliny [ The Priaslins]. This novel is Abramov's written testimony of his experience as a young soldier sent to the rear to

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Reference Guide to Russian Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Reference Guide to Russian Literature *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Advisers xi
  • Contributors xi
  • Alphabetical List of Writers and Works xiii
  • Alphabetical List of Works xix
  • Chronological List of Writers xxiii
  • General Reading List xxvii
  • Chronology xxxv
  • Glossary xxxix
  • Introductory Essays *
  • Old Russian Literature 3
  • Pre-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 9
  • Russian Literature in the I8th Century 13
  • Aleksandr Pushkin: from Byron to Shakespeare 18
  • The Classic Russian Novel 25
  • The Superfluous Man in Russian Literature 29
  • Women's Writing in Russia 35
  • Russian Literary Theory: from the Formalists to Lotman 40
  • Post-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 45
  • Experiment and Emigration: Russian Literature, 1917-1953 49
  • Socialist Realism in Soviet Literature 55
  • Thaws, Freezes, and Wakes: Russian Literature, 1953-1991 59
  • Russian Literature in the Post-Soviet Period 64
  • Writers and Works *
  • A 73
  • B 127
  • C 213
  • D 237
  • E 271
  • F 297
  • G 311
  • H 379
  • I 389
  • K 413
  • L 485
  • M 521
  • N 559
  • O 585
  • P 611
  • R 685
  • S 707
  • T 789
  • U 859
  • V 861
  • Y 897
  • Z 899
  • Title Index 933
  • Notes on Advisers and Contributors 963
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