Reference Guide to Russian Literature

By Neil Cornwell; Nicole Christian | Go to book overview

C

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov 1860-1904
Dramatist and short-story writer

Biography

Born in Taganrog, 29 January 1860. Attended a school for Greek boys, Taganrog, 1867-68; Taganrog grammar school, 1868-79; Moscow University Medical School, 1879-84. Practised medicine in Moscow, 1884-92; worked in Melikhovo, 1892-99, and in Yalta from 1899. Wrote for humorous magazines while still in medical school; began to publish in St Petersburg daily papers, Peterburgskaia gazeta, from 1885, and Novoe vremia, from 1886. Travelled across Siberia to Sakhalin Island, where he undertook a study of social and economic conditions, 1890; published the results of his research as Ostrov Sakhalin ( The Island: A Journey to Sakhalin), 1895. Suffered from tuberculosis; forced to live as a semi-invalid after a severe haemorrhage of the lungs, 1897. Recipient: Pushkin Prize, 1888. Member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences, 1900 (resigned 1902). Married: the actress, Ol'ga Knipper in 1901. Died in Badenweiler, Germany, 15 July 1904.


Publications

Collected Editions

Tales, translated by Constance Garnett, 13 vols. London, Chatto and Windus, and New York, Macmillan, 1916-22.

Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem [ Complete Works and Letters], 20 vols. Moscow, 1944-51.

Plays, translated by Elisaveta Fen.Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1959.

Lady with Lapdog and Other Stories, translated by David Magarshack . Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1964.

The Oxford Chekhov, edited and translated by Ronald Hingley, 9 vols. London, Oxford University Press, 1964-80; excerpted in "The World's Classics", Oxford, Oxford University Press, as Seven Stories, 1974; Eleven Stories, 1975; Five Major Plays, 1977; The Russian Master and Other Stories, 1984; Ward Number Six and Other Stories, 1988; A Woman's Kingdom and Other Stories, 1989; The Princess and Other Stories, 1990; The Steppe and Other Stories, 1991; Twelve Plays, 1992.

Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem, 30 vols. Moscow, 1974-83.

Plays, edited and translated by Eugene K. Bristow. New York, Norton, 1977.

The Kiss and Other Stories, translated by Ronald Wilks. Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1982.

Plays, translated by Michael Frayn. London and New York, Methuen, 1982; revised editions, 1988, 1993.

The Early Stories 1883-1888, edited and translated by Patrick Miles and Harvey Pitcher. London, John Murray, 1982; London, Abacus, 1984; Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994.

The Duel and Other Stories, translated by Ronald Wilks. Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1984.

The Party and Other Stories, translated by Ronald Wilks. Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1985.

The Fiancee and Other Stories, translated by Ronald Wilks. Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1986.

The Chekhov Omnibus: Selected Stories, translated by Constance Garnett, revised and edited by Donald Rayfield. London, Everyman, 1994.

Chekhov's Major Plays: Ivanov, Uncle Vanya, and The Three Sisters, translated by Karl Kramer and Margaret Booker. Lanham, Maryland, University Press of America, 1996.

The Plays of Anton Chekhov, translated by Paul Schmidt. New York, HarperCollins, 1997.


Fiction (selected)

"Drama na okhote" [ Drama on a Hunt]. 1884-85; translated as The Shooting Party, by A. E. Chamot, edited by Julian Symons , London, Andre Deutsch, 1986.

"Step"'. 1888; translated as "The Steppe". " Skuchnaia istoriia". 1889; translated as " A Dreary Story"; also as " A Boring Story"; and as " A Tedious Story".

"Duel"'. 1891; translated as "The Duel".

"Poprygun'ia". 1892; translated as "The Grasshopper".

"Palata No. 6". 1892; translated as "Ward Six".

"Chernyi monakh". 1894; translated as "The Black Monk".

"Student". 1894; translated as "The Student".

"Moia zhizn"'. 1896; translated as "My Life".

"Dom s mezonimom". 1896; translated as "The House with the Mezzanine".

"Muzhiki". 1897; translated as "Peasants".

"Kryzhovnik". 1898; translated as "Gooseberries".

"Ionych". 1898.

"Chelovek v futliare". 1898; translated as "Man in a Case"; also as "Man in a Suitcase"; and as "Man in a Box".

"Dama s sobachkoi". 1899; translated as "The Lady with a Lapdog"; also as "The Lady with a Dog"; "The Lady with a Little Dog"; "Lady with Lapdog" and as "The Lady with the Dog".

"Dushechka". 1899; translated as "The Darling".

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Reference Guide to Russian Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Reference Guide to Russian Literature *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Advisers xi
  • Contributors xi
  • Alphabetical List of Writers and Works xiii
  • Alphabetical List of Works xix
  • Chronological List of Writers xxiii
  • General Reading List xxvii
  • Chronology xxxv
  • Glossary xxxix
  • Introductory Essays *
  • Old Russian Literature 3
  • Pre-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 9
  • Russian Literature in the I8th Century 13
  • Aleksandr Pushkin: from Byron to Shakespeare 18
  • The Classic Russian Novel 25
  • The Superfluous Man in Russian Literature 29
  • Women's Writing in Russia 35
  • Russian Literary Theory: from the Formalists to Lotman 40
  • Post-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 45
  • Experiment and Emigration: Russian Literature, 1917-1953 49
  • Socialist Realism in Soviet Literature 55
  • Thaws, Freezes, and Wakes: Russian Literature, 1953-1991 59
  • Russian Literature in the Post-Soviet Period 64
  • Writers and Works *
  • A 73
  • B 127
  • C 213
  • D 237
  • E 271
  • F 297
  • G 311
  • H 379
  • I 389
  • K 413
  • L 485
  • M 521
  • N 559
  • O 585
  • P 611
  • R 685
  • S 707
  • T 789
  • U 859
  • V 861
  • Y 897
  • Z 899
  • Title Index 933
  • Notes on Advisers and Contributors 963
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