John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility

By Dennis Flynn | Go to book overview

3
DONNE'S FAMILY AND
EARLY MILIEU

MUCH LESS IS known about the paternal side of Donne's family, because the lineage of John Donne the elder is not yet clear. Apparently descended from the Carmarthenshire Dwns, he may have come from a branch of the family that settled near Chester. He had a cousin, Alice, who served in the Donne household; and a sister, Grace, who was married to Robert Dawson of Oxford. The Dawsons operated an inn suspected as a Catholic house: one of their lodgers was a former New College don who had been expelled for popery. 1 Other than these few details about the elder Donne's family, we know only that they apprenticed him sometime during the reign of Queen Mary to Thomas Lewen, a hardware merchant, alderman, and Sheriff of London.

This choice of a master is significant for the student of Donne the poet, for it suggests the flavor of determined Catholicism that permeated both the life of Donne's father and the neighborhood where Donne himself spent his earliest years. Lewen's household, which included the apprentice Donne, was situated in the most staunchly Catholic district of London, the parish of St. Nicholas Olave, where the death of Edward VI had been observed by a peremptory return to singing the Latin mass. (St. Nicholas Olave was actually the second parish in London to take this step, the first having been the adjacent parish of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey.) 2 The death of King Edward brought Lewen an opportunity to return to prominence in the City administration and in the Ironmongers Company. Under Edward, his Catholicism had made it impossible for him to continue in office as Sheriff. 3 Donne served out his apprenticeship

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility *
  • Contents *
  • Figures *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction: Portrait of a Swordsman *
  • Part One Donne's Catholic Heritage *
  • 1: Sir Thomas More and His Family *
  • 2: Ellis and Jasper Heywood *
  • 3: Donne's Family and Early Milieu *
  • 4: The Persistent Catholicism of Donne's Family *
  • Part Two Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility *
  • 5: Henry Percy, Eighth Earl of Northumberland *
  • 6: The Jesuit Mission and the "Enterprise" of 1582 *
  • 7: The Defeats of Heywood and Northumberland *
  • 8: Donne's Flight from the Persecution *
  • 9: Heywood in Exile Again *
  • 10: Henry Stanley, Fourth Earl of Derby *
  • Conclusion *
  • Appendix: Donne's Latin Epigrams *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.