John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility

By Dennis Flynn | Go to book overview

NOTES
Abbreviations
APC Acts of the Privy Council of England
ARSI Archivum Romanum Societatis Iesu
Dom. Cal. Eliz. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series..., Elizabeth
For. Cal. Eliz. Calendar of State Papers, Foreign Series ..., Elizabeth
HMC Bath Historical Manuscript Commission, Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Bath ...
HMC Rutland Historical Manuscript Commission, The Manuscripts of His Grace the Duke of Rutland...
HMC Salisbury Historical Manuscript Commission, Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Most Honourable the Marquis of Salisbury ...
Pat. Cal. Eliz. Calendar of the Patent Rolls ..., Elizabeth
Pat. Cal. Mary Calendar of the Patent Rolls ..., Philip and Mary
PCRS Publications of the Catholic Record Society
PRO Public Record Office
Scot. Cal. Calendar of State Papers Relating to Scotland ...
Span. Cal. Eliz. Calendar of Letters and State Papers, Spanish, Elizabeth
Ven. Cal. Calendar of State Papers, Venetian

Introduction
I.
Walton's biography of Donne was first published in 1640 (see n. 10 below). For this comment, see Izaak Walton, The Lives of John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, George Herbert, Richard Hooker, and Robert Sanderson ( London: Oxford University Press, 1956), 79. Walton seems unaware of other sixteenth- or seventeenth-century work combining the plastic and language arts (e.g., the impresa, discussed by Mario Praz as "nothing less than a symbolical representation of a purpose, a wish, a line of conduct . . . by means of a motto and a picture which reciprocally interpret each other"). Praz also quotes a seventeenth-century French source that defines such a work as "[U]ne Poésie, qui ne chante point, qui n'est composée que d'une Figure muette, et d'un Mot qui parle pour elle à la veue. La merveille est, que cette Poésie sans Musique fait en un moment, avec cette Figure et ce Mot, ce que l'autre Poésie ne scauroit faire qu'avec un long temps et de grands préparatifs d'harmonies, de fictions et de machines" ( Studies in Seventeenth-century Imagery [ Rome: Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 1975], 58 and 60). An ungainly kite, the present book will attempt to supply through historical research what "l'autre Poésie" might also do. On Donne's interest in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century portraiture and painting, see Ernest Gilman, " 'To adore, or scorn an image': Donne and the Iconoclastic Controversy," John Donne Journal 5 ( 1986): 62-100.

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John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility *
  • Contents *
  • Figures *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction: Portrait of a Swordsman *
  • Part One Donne's Catholic Heritage *
  • 1: Sir Thomas More and His Family *
  • 2: Ellis and Jasper Heywood *
  • 3: Donne's Family and Early Milieu *
  • 4: The Persistent Catholicism of Donne's Family *
  • Part Two Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility *
  • 5: Henry Percy, Eighth Earl of Northumberland *
  • 6: The Jesuit Mission and the "Enterprise" of 1582 *
  • 7: The Defeats of Heywood and Northumberland *
  • 8: Donne's Flight from the Persecution *
  • 9: Heywood in Exile Again *
  • 10: Henry Stanley, Fourth Earl of Derby *
  • Conclusion *
  • Appendix: Donne's Latin Epigrams *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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