To Create a New World? American Presidents and the United Nations

By John Allphin Moore Jr.; Jerry Pubantz | Go to book overview

matriculation at West Point Military Academy and his participation in 1913 as a cadet corporal in the first inaugural parade of Woodrow Wilson. He shared Wilson's belief that America must be permanently a part of world affairs. The two world wars and the unhappy turn of events between 1919 and 1939 further convinced him of Wilson's wisdom. It was in that context that Eisenhower believed President Wilson would have taken pride, as the general himself had, in the creation of the United Nations, the "lineal descendant" of the League of Nations. It was against the possibility of the United States repeating its mistakes of the 1920s and 1930s that Eisenhower fought to win the White House.

A new menace, as great as Hitler's Germany, now threatened American survival—namely Soviet communism. For the president it was nothing less than a life-and-death matter. Believing that the confrontation with Moscow was "the struggle of the ages," 7 Eisenhower argued that only the unity of free nations led by the United States could provide a "hope for survival." In that conceptualization there was only a limited role for a world organization built on universal collective security and characterized by the regular use of the Soviet veto. Invoking the collective self-defense provisions of the Charter's Article 51, the administration pursued a series of military alliances as the most effective means of preserving the principles embodied in the UN founding.


The President, His Foreign Policy Team, and the UN

The first weeks of 1953 proved to be extraordinarily challenging for the new president. An expected armistice proved elusive in Korea, where continued fighting produced ongoing American causalities. Having promised to "go to Korea," and having met the letter of that promise with a visit to the war zone as president-elect, Eisenhower was under pressure domestically and from the allies to conclude the United Nations' effort successfully and quickly. In Europe the solidification of the iron curtain with a huge Soviet army threatening a divided Germany put a premium on American defense of the western democracies. Yet the president had promised to cut the ballooning federal deficit, and hoped to do so by putting the brakes on military spending. Contributing to military costs was the emerging strategic arms race with the Russians. Faced with a Soviet conventional military advantage, the administration

____________________
7
News conference of December 2, 1953, PPP, 1953, 801-802.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
To Create a New World? American Presidents and the United Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.