The Founding Myths of Israel: Nationalism, Socialism, and the Making of the Jewish State

By Zeev Sternhell; David Maisel | Go to book overview

Notes

The Hebrew titles of works, articles, and documents in the notes are given in an English translation. Where a literal translation was not possible, I made a “free” translation, taking into consideration the content of the work. For the Hebrew titles, please see the bibliography. Page numbers always refer to the original edition.


Preface
1
There is an excellent review of these issues in Gulie Ne'eman Arad, ed., “Israeli Historiography Revisited,” a special issue of History and Memory 7, no. 1 (spring/ summer 1995). The six contributions contain good bibliographical references. Readers interested in that debate should start here.

The most recent exposé of the official “conservative” approach to the history of Jewish Palestine until the War of Independence can be found in Moshe Lissak, Anita Shapira, and Gabriel Cohen, eds., The History of the Jewish Community in Eretz Israel since 1882: The Period of the British Mandate, pt. 2 (in Hebrew) (Jerusalem: Bialik Institute and Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1994). On the other side of the historiographical fence, post-Zionist ideology is presented by Boaz Evron, Jewish State or Israeli Nation? (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995) and the new “critical sociology” by Uri Ram, The Changing Agenda of Israeli Sociology: Theory, Ideology, and Identity (Albany: SUNY Press, 1995).


Introduction
1
David Ben-Gurion, From Class to Nation: Reflections on the Vocation and Mission of the Labor Movement (in Hebrew) (Tel Aviv: Am Oved, 1976), p. 13.

On Zionism, its history, its vision, and the people who made it, see Walter Laqueur, A History of Zionism (New York: Schocken Books, 1978); Mitchell Cohen, Zion and State: Nation, Class, and the Shaping of Modern Israel (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987); David Vital, The Origins of Zionism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975) and Zionism: The Formative Years (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982); Ben Halpern, The Idea of the Jewish State (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1969); Shlomo Avineri, The Making of Modern Zionism (New York: Basic Books, 1981); and Arthur Hertzberg, ed., The Zionist Idea: A Historical Analysis and Reader (New York: Atheneum, 1977).

2
Dan Horowitz and Moshe Lissak, Troubles in Utopia (in Hebrew) (Tel Aviv: Am Oved, 1990), p. 15. Translated into English by Horowitz and Lissak as Trouble in Utopia: The Overburdened Polity of Israel (Albany: SUNY Press, 1989). Similar statements appear in the first book written by these two scholars, From the Yishuv to the State: The Jews of Eretz Israel as a Political Community during the Period of the British Mandate (in Hebrew) (Tel Aviv: Am Oved, 1977), p. 182. Revised translation into English by Horowitz and Lissak: Origins of the Israeli Polity: Palestine under the Mandate (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1978).

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