Anglo-American Antiphony: The Late Romanticism of Tennyson and Emerson

By Richard E. Brantley | Go to book overview

FOURTEEN
Experience and Faith

Experience and faith in The Over-Soul, in that the Over-Soul "contradicts all experience" and "abolishes time and space" (912), appear antipodal if not mutually exclusive, and the transcendentalism can be Platonic, for Emerson writes that "I desire, even by profane words, if sacred I may not use, to indicate the heaven of this deity," namely, the Over-Soul, "and to report what hints I have collected of the transcendent simplicity and energy of the Highest Law" (911). His belief that "the spirit of prophecy" is "innate in every man" (911) keeps far from the twofold view shared among Locke, Wesley, and Edwards that knowledge of God is no more a priori than any other kind of knowledge and that nothing is innate. Perhaps the most fundamental assumption of evangelical faith is its precisely experiential efficacy, and surely no evangelical would approve of the rhapsodic tone of apotheosis, whereby Emerson goes so far as to imply an equation between one's aspiring to and one's attaining to Godhead: "For, in ascending to this primary and aboriginal sentiment {of moral beatitude}, we have come from one remote station on the circumference instantaneously to the centre of the world, where, as in the closet of God, we see causes, and anticipate the universe, which is but a slow effect" (914). Thus The Over-Soul can seem as far as possible from empirical actuality and from evangelical idealism. Of all the critics whom I cite, only Richard Poirier analyzes The Over-Soul in terms resembling mine; in understanding the Over-Soul according to its "secularized versions" in both the genetic codes of today's science and the evolutionary theory of Emerson's day, Poirier compares it to William James's "primordial units of mind-stuff or mind-dust," which James represents as "summing themselves together in successive stages

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anglo-American Antiphony: The Late Romanticism of Tennyson and Emerson
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.