Inside the White House in War Times: Memoirs and Reports of Lincoln's Secretary

By William O. Stoddard; Michael Burlingame | Go to book overview

Realities and the Drama

"If you can do anything for the passage of the National Bank Act you ought not to fail of doing it. There seems to be no other way for placing four hundred millions more of government bonds."

The other features of the Act, as a vital part of the policy of the Administration, are briefly rehearsed by the speaker, very much as you already understand them.

"Beyond a doubt," he says, "a decisive vote will be reached to-morrow, and the bill will surely be defeated, unless-----in the Senate, and----- in the House can be induced to support it. They are good enough Republicans, but they are going the other way, some of them for one reason, some for another."

"And mostly without reason! Perhaps something can be done!"

Very likely the views of such men as he has indicated cannot easily be changed, but there are sometimes curious coincidences nowadays. It happens that the very Senators and Congressmen named, and not any others have been invited to attend a meeting of a committee of the Grand Council of Twelve of the Union League this very evening, to discuss the work of the League in their States and districts. They all are members of the League, and they have gladly agreed to come; for their very seats in either House depend upon the support they receive from the great party machine.

We may as well attend that meeting, for many subjects of interest may come up for discussion.

There is no better place for a caucus than in the room of Grand President Edmunds in the Land Office. The committee of the Grand Council is not large. It is a mere business committee for practical work, but it has facts and figures to present which are intensely interesting, not to say gratifying, to the invited legislators. They are as pleased a lot of patriotic politicians as ever listened to the details of a thorough work of local organization for their

-103-

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Inside the White House in War Times: Memoirs and Reports of Lincoln's Secretary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Introduction vii
  • 1 - Inside the White House in War Times 1
  • Opening the Door 3
  • Persons and Papers 11
  • Weapons and War Ships 19
  • Gifts and Visitors 26
  • The Critics and the Gamblers 33
  • Bronzes and Earthworks 40
  • The Reception 47
  • A Variety of Uniforms 54
  • The Two Chieftains 61
  • The Monitor and the Union League 68
  • The Capitol and the Future 75
  • Sentries and Passes 82
  • A Battle Summer 89
  • The Echoes of the Proclamation 96
  • Realities and the Drama 103
  • A Vigil and a Victory 110
  • July 4th, 1863 117
  • The Contrabands and the New Captain 121
  • Pictures and Reports 127
  • There is an End of All Things 134
  • 2 - White House Sketches 141
  • Sketch 1 143
  • Sketch 2 148
  • Sketch 3 153
  • Sketch 4 156
  • Sketch 5 160
  • Sketch 6 165
  • Sketch 7 170
  • Sketch 8 176
  • Sketch 9 180
  • Sketch 10 184
  • Sketch 11 189
  • Sketch 12 193
  • Sketch 13 198
  • Notes 203
  • Index 221
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