The Politics of World Hunger: Grass-Roots Politics and World Poverty

By Paul Simon; Arthur Simon | Go to book overview

A Note to the Reader

Sometimes actors have to exaggerate on stage in order to reach the audience. Frequently writers do the same, hoping they can arouse the public by taking a more strident position on an issue than the facts warrant.

This book does not shout; it does not scream or deal in extremes. It simply discusses things we ignore, and points out the peril of ignoring them. Reality is shocking enough, if the reader reflects on the parade of facts assembled.

The reality to which I refer above all is hungry people. They comprise a majority of the population in most countries of the world, and they go hungry because they are wretchedly poor. There was a time when we could ignore this reality and life for us went on as usual. Not any more. Too many things have put nations in close touch with each other. If conditions become increasingly less tolerable for much of the world, we too will suffer the consequences.

The way we respond to the hungry half of mankind will profoundly influence our foreign policy, our military posture, and even a wide assortment of domestic con

-xix-

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The Politics of World Hunger: Grass-Roots Politics and World Poverty
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • A Note to the Reader xix
  • Part 1 - Hunger, Population, and Poverty 1
  • 1 - Establishing a Point of View 3
  • 2 - The Hungry Majority 19
  • 3 - The Poor Have More 45
  • 4 - A Widening Gap 71
  • Part II - The Way Out 79
  • 5 - The Development Struggle 81
  • 6 - Agricultural Development 91
  • 7 - Industrial Development 98
  • 8 - Trade 104
  • 9 - Economic Assistance 109
  • 10 - Models of Development 114
  • 11 - Food or Clean Air ? 129
  • Part III - U.S. Policy 143
  • 12 - The Rediscovery of America 145
  • 13 - Trade, Free and Fair 154
  • 14 - Profits Abroad 161
  • 15 - Foreign Aid: a Case of Intentions 167
  • 16 - Let Them Eat Missiles 183
  • Part IV - A Program for Action 195
  • 17 - Proposal for Global Development 197
  • 18 - Political Nuts and Bolts 213
  • Index 239
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