The Politics of World Hunger: Grass-Roots Politics and World Poverty

By Paul Simon; Arthur Simon | Go to book overview

13
Trade, Free and Fair

As most of us learned from our childhood friends, trade is an exchange freely agreed upon between parties so that each secures a benefit. That idea remains the working model for nations as well, but in practice the benefits tend to favor rich countries and tag poor ones as losers. This troublesome fact suggests that in its own policy the United States adopt several overdue reforms in order to move toward the goal of equitable trade. Otherwise, for the sake of a few short-range advantages this nation will be spreading hunger and poverty abroad.

The United States should remove barriers to free trade. The resurgence of protectionism reflects a short-sighted grasp of world realities, as well as defective leadership. Protective tariffs and import quotas work a particular hardship on poor countries, which need to develop markets as they industrialize. Virtually all economists agree that these barriers need to be reduced, if not eliminated, and the trend for several decades has been in that direction. Still, barriers are maintained and occasionally enlarged. The period of the early 1970s was marked by rising protectionist

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The Politics of World Hunger: Grass-Roots Politics and World Poverty
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • A Note to the Reader xix
  • Part 1 - Hunger, Population, and Poverty 1
  • 1 - Establishing a Point of View 3
  • 2 - The Hungry Majority 19
  • 3 - The Poor Have More 45
  • 4 - A Widening Gap 71
  • Part II - The Way Out 79
  • 5 - The Development Struggle 81
  • 6 - Agricultural Development 91
  • 7 - Industrial Development 98
  • 8 - Trade 104
  • 9 - Economic Assistance 109
  • 10 - Models of Development 114
  • 11 - Food or Clean Air ? 129
  • Part III - U.S. Policy 143
  • 12 - The Rediscovery of America 145
  • 13 - Trade, Free and Fair 154
  • 14 - Profits Abroad 161
  • 15 - Foreign Aid: a Case of Intentions 167
  • 16 - Let Them Eat Missiles 183
  • Part IV - A Program for Action 195
  • 17 - Proposal for Global Development 197
  • 18 - Political Nuts and Bolts 213
  • Index 239
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