History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X

Blaine's nomination was certain to be followed by Grover Cleveland's. Here was a Democrat who would receive the support of the Independent Republicans; and, indeed, at the Democratic convention, meeting in Chicago on July 8, he was nominated on the second ballot. The opposition to him came from Tammany Hall and Benjamin F. Butler and, though noisy and vehement in its declaration that Cleveland could not carry New York State, it showed no important strength in the balloting. "We love him most of all for the enemies he has made,"1 declared the seconder of Cleveland's nomination; and the sentiment to which this declaration gave rise dominated the delegates. On the second ballot Cleveland received 683 of 820 votes, considerably more than the twothirds necessary to effect a nomination.2

Students of politics may read the lengthy and dreary platforms of both conventions which have been faithfully reproduced by Edward Stanwood in his valuable book;3 they may go further and read the letters of acceptances

____________________
1
The Nation, July 17, 1884.
2
During June Samuel J. Tilden, who was physically unable to make any sort of a campaign, declined the Democratic nomination in a dignified letter. He received a graceful reference in the Democratic platform in which his martyrdom was kept before the public. The Nation in a brief article of June 19, p. 515, states Tilden's case, according to my view, with truthful accuracy.
3
A History of the Presidency.

-215-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • History of the United States from Hayes to Mckinley 1
  • Chapter II 52
  • Chapter III 88
  • Chapter IV 109
  • Chapter V 128
  • Chapter VI 139
  • Chapter VII 161
  • Chapter VIII 180
  • Chapter IX 197
  • Chapter X 215
  • Chapter XI 240
  • Chapter XII 255
  • Chapter XIII 305
  • Chapter XIV 328
  • Chapter XV 341
  • Chapter XVI 365
  • Chapter XVII 380
  • Chapter XVIII 394
  • Chapter XIX 418
  • Chapter XX 443
  • Index 463
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