History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII

Because James G. Blaine was an interesting man the Republican nomination for President in 1892 seemed to depend upon his action. Quay and Platt were opposed to Harrison. The President had also alienated Speaker Reed and other workers who would have been helpful in securing a renomination, and largely from personal qualities, could not arouse any enthusiasm among the rank and file of the party. "Blaine," wrote Senator Hoar, "would refuse a request in a way that would seem like doing a favor. Harrison would grant a request in a way which seemed as if he were denying it."1 It appeared to many shrewd partisans that Harrison meant defeat while Blaine would insure a party victory. He was now strong in New York, so the argument ran, and he was advocated in the Western States by personal attachment and persistency of purpose. Clarkson who at present was the chairman of the Republican National Committee asserted that he would receive a large part of German support and was the only man "who could draw from the Farmers' Alliance the necessary votes to help the party in power in the Northwestern States." But Blaine could not be persuaded to make the contest. I am not a candidate for the presidency," he wrote to Clarkson on February 6, "and

____________________
1
Autobiography, i. 414.

-380-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • History of the United States from Hayes to Mckinley 1
  • Chapter II 52
  • Chapter III 88
  • Chapter IV 109
  • Chapter V 128
  • Chapter VI 139
  • Chapter VII 161
  • Chapter VIII 180
  • Chapter IX 197
  • Chapter X 215
  • Chapter XI 240
  • Chapter XII 255
  • Chapter XIII 305
  • Chapter XIV 328
  • Chapter XV 341
  • Chapter XVI 365
  • Chapter XVII 380
  • Chapter XVIII 394
  • Chapter XIX 418
  • Chapter XX 443
  • Index 463
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