History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview
INDEX
Abott, J. S., Electoral Commission, vii. 327.
Abbott, J. S. C., Napoleon, ii. 553.
Abolition, obstacles, i. 381; probable effect of Cuban, 394. See alsoAbolitionism; Emancipation; Slavery.
Abolitionism, work, i. 58; and Congress, 67; growth, 73; Webster on, 152; and Kossuth, 242; and Christianity, 372; increasing popularity, 495; and Constitution, ii. 57; and Republican party, 98, 436; and John Brown, 410; Corwin on, 425; and disunion, 435; held responsible for secession, attacked, iii. 59, 60.
Adams, C. F., Sr., supports Hale ( 1852), i. 264; in campaign of 1860, ii. 440 n.; on need of a Jackson, iii. 22 n.; and House compromise plan, 154 n.-156 n.; on reasons for secession, 184, 185; on England's neutrality proclamation, 306, 307; as minister to England, 312, 313; on English sentiment towards war, 316- 318, 320, 321, 344; and Trent affair, 410 n.; on war and English democracy, 417 n.; on Trent affair reaction, 421 n.; and Alabama, iv. 85-88, 91; on English conservatives and war, 92 n.; on Gladstone's Newcastle speech, 340 n.; instructions in case of offered mediation, 342, 343; probable use of these, 343; on England and Emancipation Proclamation, 349 n., 350 n., 353 n., 354, 357 n.; on Russell and proclamation, 357 n., 358 n.; fears rupture ( Feb.-April, 1863), 363, 366, 367, 372 n.; on cotton famine, urges Alabama claims, 365; on Alabama debate, 369; on Roebuck's speech, 375 n.; and Laird rams, 377-384; on Mason in England, 386 n., 387 n.; faultless course, 387.; distrusts Napoleon, 389 n.; sale-of-arms dispute, 391, 392; on scarcity of labour ( 1863), v. 205; on Sumner's Alabama claims speech, vi. 451, 452; arbitrator of Alabama claims, 475; on American Case, 476; and revival of indirect claims, 478; initiates rejection of them, 481, 482; vote on award, 483; conduct as arbitrator, 485; hero of Arbitration, 487; and Liberal Republican nomination, vii. 37; letter on his candidacy, 39-41; balloting for, in the convention, 44, 45.
Adams, C. F., Jr., on issue in 1860, iii. 151, n.; acknowledgments to, iv. 83 n., vi. 111 n.; on Sumner and Treaty of Washington, 470; on Louisiana affairs ( 1875), vii. 186, 187; on civil service under Cleveland, viii. 254.
Adams, H. C., on Legal-Tender act, iii. 454 n.
Adams, Henry, on Calhoun and Jefferson, i. 380 n.; on culture function of America, ii. 463 n.; on American indolence, 475 n.; on pecuniary honesty, 569 n.; on legal tender, iii. 455, vi. 340, 375; on panic of 1893, viii. 402; on World's Fair, 417.
Adams, J. H., South Carolina commissioner, iii. 102, 110; and Buchanan, 113, 121, 122.
Adams, John, on Webster, i. 138 n.
Adams, John Q., on Calhoun, i. 41; on Channing, 64 n.; on abolition, in Congress, 69; character and diary, 71; and Seward, 162; supported by Fillmore, 178; on Everett, 291; on Jefferson Davis, 390; on slavery, 494; Seward on, ii. 103.

-463-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • History of the United States from Hayes to Mckinley 1
  • Chapter II 52
  • Chapter III 88
  • Chapter IV 109
  • Chapter V 128
  • Chapter VI 139
  • Chapter VII 161
  • Chapter VIII 180
  • Chapter IX 197
  • Chapter X 215
  • Chapter XI 240
  • Chapter XII 255
  • Chapter XIII 305
  • Chapter XIV 328
  • Chapter XV 341
  • Chapter XVI 365
  • Chapter XVII 380
  • Chapter XVIII 394
  • Chapter XIX 418
  • Chapter XX 443
  • Index 463
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