Recognizing Ourselves: Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment

By Ellen Lewin | Go to book overview

1
EQUAL RITES

As we emerged from the subway near the Internal Revenue Service headquarters, it was clear that my partner Liz and I were part of a large mass of people all going to the same event. It was Saturday, April 24, 1993, the day before the national March on Washington for Lesbian, Gay, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, and "the Wedding" was one of many related activities taking place throughout the march weekend. Organized by Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) founder Troy Perry, 1 the Wedding was advertised as an event that would combine a marriage ritual with a protest against the continuing lack of legal recognition for lesbian and gay marriage. Its location, in front of IRS headquarters (which was, of course, closed on Saturday), emphasized the injustice done by a system that uses marriage to confer innumerable

____________________
"The Wedding," Washington, D.C., April 24, 1993 (Photo by Wilfredo Leecourtesy the Associated Press)

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recognizing Ourselves: Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Between Men ∼ Between Women Lesbian and Gay Studies v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue xv
  • 1 - Equal Rites 1
  • 2 - Heroes in Our Own Dramas 29
  • 3 - Old Symbols, New Traditions 47
  • 4 - This Circle of Family 87
  • 5 - Communities Interwoven 123
  • 6 - The Real Thing 159
  • 7 - Making a Statement 193
  • 8 - Mixed Messages 235
  • Notes 253
  • References 269
  • Index 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.