The Columbia History of Western Philosophy

By Richard H. Popkin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I should like to take this opportunity to thank those who have aided me in the preparation of this volume.

First of all, I should like to thank Robert John Arias, a former student of mine, who did much of the initial work looking over the contributions and getting them organized in a common computer program. He gave me much valuable advice in putting the entire volume together.

Next, I owe much gratitude to four research assistants of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Center at UCLA, Kimberley Garmoe, Russell Ives Court, Anna Suranyi, and Tim Corrall, who most ably aided me in finishing the volume, editing manuscripts, doing library research, and many other tasks.

Then, I should like to take this opportunity to thank Franz Peter Hugdahl of Columbia University Press, with whom I have been in almost constant communication. We have worked out many critical problems together, and he has worked valiantly to finally bring the volume to publication.

Thanks are also due to Keith Frome, formerly of Columbia University Press, who first suggested to me that I undertake the task of organizing a new one-volume history of Western philosophy, and to James Raimes of the Research Publishing Division of Columbia University Press, who supervised the venture at the publisher's end and who has always been most helpful in assisting me in overcoming various problems and difficulties.

In addition, I should like to thank all of the contributors for their excellent work and for jointly making this a volume that we all can be proud of.

Finally, I would like to express my personal feeling of satisfaction that it was my

-xiii-

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The Columbia History of Western Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Columbia History of Western Philosophy *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Contributors xxi
  • The Columbia History of Western Philosophy *
  • 1 - Origins of Western Philosophic Thinking 1
  • 2 - Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy 140
  • 3 - Medieval Christian Philosophy 219
  • 4 - The Renaissance 279
  • 5 - Seventeenth-Century Philosophy 329
  • 6 - Eighteenth-Century Philosophy 422
  • 7 - Nineteenth-Century Philosophy 516
  • 8 - Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy 604
  • 9 - Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy 667
  • Epilogue 755
  • Epilogue - On the History of Philosophy 757
  • Index of Names 779
  • Index of Subject 801
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