Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar

By Waltraud Coles; Bill Dodd | Go to book overview

11
Five Short Texts
This chapter contains five short texts on which to practise your independent reading skills, before progressing to longer and more complex texts in Chapters 12 to 16. It also sets out a suggested method for approaching new texts, and especially the kind of longer text contained in the following chapters.As you begin to tackle longer and more sophisticated German texts for the first time you should try to develop a clear set of reading strategies. The rationale for these strategies has already been introduced in Chapter 10. As you work through the texts in the later chapters of this course you may decide to adapt some of the reading strategies set out there, depending on which of them you find most helpful. The important point is that you should begin to develop a set of conscious strategies of your own for tackling German texts.
Working with a Text in Three Stages
The remaining chapters of this course will work with a method of tackling a text in three main phases: pre-reading, intensive reading, and post-reading. Before reading these texts intensively, practise the 'pre-reading' exercises described below. After reading them, do the 'post-reading' exercises. This will involve going back over part or all of the text to check that you have understood details properly.
Pre-reading
There are many strategies which can help to improve your understanding of the text before you actually begin to read it intensively. Before you read the texts in this chapter you should practise the following simple pre-reading routine:
1. Spend a minute or two calling to mind (in English) everything you know about the topic being discussed in the text. Focus particularly on the important vocabulary that comes to mind when you do this.
2. Skim the text (do not try to close-read it) and note any special features that strike you. These can include subheadings, graphs, highlighted words (e.g. italics), brackets, numbers.
3. Skim the text again, this time looking for any words which 'jump out' because they are already familiar, or look guessable.

These simple exercises should be done without reading the text closely, i.e. 'word by word, sentence by sentence'. Simply let your eye travel over the text, from beginning to end and then back again. Further suggestions for you to try at the pre-reading stage are set out in later chapters.

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Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Authors' Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • About This Book x
  • Part I - Reading Course 1
  • List of Chapter Topics 3
  • 1 9
  • 2 14
  • 3 22
  • 4 30
  • 5 38
  • 6 44
  • 7 51
  • 8 58
  • 9 65
  • 10 73
  • 11 80
  • 12 89
  • 13 94
  • 14 98
  • 15 104
  • 16 110
  • Key to Coursebook Exercises 117
  • Part II - Reference Section 131
  • List of Topics 133
  • Key to Further Exercises 321
  • Part IV - German-English Text Corpus 335
  • List of Texts 336
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