Unpaid Professionals: Commercialism and Conflict in Big-Time College Sports

By Andrew Zimbalist | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE

Whither Big-Time College Sports?
REFORM AND THE FUTURE

We really don't know what's going to happen, but the pressures building in the system are so great it's hard to imagine college sports staying the same.

Gary Roberts, professor of sports law at Tulane University and NCAA athletic representative

We believe the culture and environment surrounding the development and recruitment of the elite youth player is so contaminated that failure to adopt a series of structural changes in the sport will undoubtedly lead to further tragedy and scandal.

Jim Delany, commissioner Big Ten Conference

I would be very surprised if there aren't substantial and comprehensive changes within the next year in men's basketball. College basketball is a wonderful sport, but it is time to expunge the worst elements that are in the game today.

Robert Bowlsby, athletic director of the University of Iowa and chairperson of the new Division I Management Council

The type of reformers I refer to are those who play with questions for public consumption….I wonder if there are not grounds to suspect that the reformers … protest too much, that their zeal may be an excuse for their own negligence in reforming themselves … true reform in athletics will not be accomplished by the mere publishing of noble, high-sounding codes which are often hypocritically evaded in actual practice.

Notre Dame President John Cavanaugh, January 1947

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