God at the Grass Roots: The Christian Right in the 1994 Elections

By Mark J. Rozell; Clyde Wilcox | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

Nancy L. Bednar is a graduate fellow at the Carl Albert Center, University of Oklahoma. Her dissertation is on the Christian Right in Congressional elections.

John M. Bruce is an assistant professor of government at Georgetown University. His work has been in the areas of mass behavior and political parties.

Charles S. Bullock III is the Richard B. Russell professor of political science at the University of Georgia— Athens. His latest book (coauthored with Loch Johnson) is Runoff Elections in the South.

Christopher P. Gilbert is assistant professor of political science at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota. He is the author of The Impact of Churches on Political Behavior and has specific research interests in religion and politics. In 1991 he received the E. E. Schattschneider Award of the American Political Science Association for best dissertation in American government and politics.

John Christopher Grant is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Georgia— Athens. His dissertation is on education innovation in the South.

John C. Green is director of the Ray C. Bliss Institute and professor of political science at the University of Akron. He has done extensive research on religion and politics and is coeditor (with James L. Guth) of The Bible and the Ballot Box.

James L. Guth is professor of political science at Furman University. He is coeditor (with John C. Green) of The Bible and the Ballot Box: Religion and Politics in the 1988 Election.

Allen D. Hertzke is associate professor of political science and assistant director of the Carl Albert Center, University of Oklahoma. He is the author of Echoes of Discontent.

William M. Lunch is a professor in the political science department at Oregon State University and the Political Analyst for Oregon Public Broadcasting.

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
God at the Grass Roots: The Christian Right in the 1994 Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.