Illuminations: An Anthology of Welsh Short Prose

By Meic Stephens | Go to book overview

There, like the old preacher, I've tried to 'say' something, and failed. The asking was right enough, but the answer is inadequate and perhaps quite wide of the mark.

Y Faner (8 Awst, 1968)


The Little Llandeilo Boots

Dafydd Rowlands

The children don't understand the relationship. But they will one day. What mystifies them is the fact that a child so young could have been an uncle. After all, it's not easy to think of a two-year-old as uncle to a man of forty. But perhaps I had better explain.

I'm not one or those fortunate people who are wealthy enough to accumulate rare and costly treasures the original oil on canvas, the small piece of carved marble, the first edition of an antiquarian book. I was tempted, some years ago, to buy a clapped-out old car at the wheel of which, so it was claimed, Lloyd George1 had once sat. But it was the same old story I'm not one of those fortunate people who are wealthy enough to accumulate . . . And yet I do possess a few odds-and-ends that I should be sorry to be without the bric-à-brac of the years that have some personal significance or family association. The picture of Leusa'r Injin, my grandmother's grandmother, hangs in the dining-room, her traditional Welsh costume coloured by the diluted, insipid oils of some long-forgotten artist from Neath. On the mantelpiece stands the brass kettle in which my forebears used to boil water but which is now nothing more than a cold ornament, a mere memento of many a cup of tea and a chat. And a host of other things, relics of the blood and family roots, symbols of an undeniable belonging. But among all the treasures in my home, the little Llandeilo boots are by far the most cherished.

My grandfather, on my mother's side, was like Naaman the Syrian 'a mighty man of valour'. A man of strong physique, he spent his days, and sometimes his nights, in the heat of iron-furnaces. And on Saturdays he would go down into the heat of the serum on the rugby-field, in the days when players of that game sported

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Illuminations: An Anthology of Welsh Short Prose
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.