Illuminations: An Anthology of Welsh Short Prose

By Meic Stephens | Go to book overview

Notes on Authors and Texts

These notes are intended for readers who have only a little knowledge of the history, language, and literature of Wales. Further biographical and bibliographical details will be found in The Oxford Companion to the Literature of Wales (ed. Meic Stephens, 1986, 1990); see also the monographs in the Writers of Wales series (eds. Meic Stephens and R. Brinley Jones).

Owen Morgan Edwards ( 1858-1920), one of the pioneers of modern Welsh prose, was born and brought up at Coed-y-pry, a small farmhouse near Lianuwchllyn in Merioneth. Educated at the U.C.W., Aberystwyth, and at Balliol College, Oxford, he was appointed Fellow and Tutor in History at Lincoln College, Oxford, in 1889. Returning to Wales in 1907 as Chief Inspector of Schools, he lived for the rest of his life in his home village. He devoted his immense energies to the fostering of education through the medium of Welsh and, in all his many writings, encouraged the people of Wales to learn about their country's history and literature. His description of the village school, and the infamous practice of the Welsh Not which flourished in many parts of Wales during the latter part of the nineteenth century, is taken from the opening chapter of his autobiography, Clych Atgof ( 1906).

1
Sunday Schools, founded in Wales during the last decade of the eighteenth century, were primarily intended for the religious instruction of the common people. Under the leadership of Thomas Charles ( 1755-1814), they spread rapidly, especially among the Methodists. Attended by young and old, male and female, the schools were largely responsible for ensuring that Nonconformist congregations became literate in the Welsh language and thus equipped to read the Bible.
2
The first verse of a hymn by Morgan Rhys ( 1716-74).

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Illuminations: An Anthology of Welsh Short Prose
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.