The Color of School Reform: Race, Politics, and the Challenge of Urban Education

By Jeffrey R. Henig; Richard C. Hula et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER SIX
Black Leaders, White Businesses:
Racial Tensions and the Construction of
Public-Private Partnerships in Education

We urge business to become a driving force in the community on behalf of public education and a prime advocate of educational initiatives for disadvantaged youngsters. (Committee for Economic Development, 1987)

Business leaders, often accused of short-term thinking, are taking the lead in a long-term revolution to save public education. (Ann B. Morrison, Fortune, 1990)

Despite the enormous stake businesses share in maintaining an educated work force, only a few business people pay more than lip service to the ongoing challenges of running a public school system. (Joe Martin, Atlanta, school board president, 1993)

There isn't a very good, in my opinion, a very good dialogue between business and the city right now so that inhibits good decision making. One of the tough things in the city is that business is looked at as a white, essentially male suburban group and the city, our city is somewhat different than other major urban areas in that it's so predominantly black and it's getting so predominantly poor that dialogue between the two groups is often difficult and limited. (Black member of the Greater Detroit Chamber of Commerce, 1993)

ADVOCATES of systemic school reform frequently include public-private partnerships on the list of initiatives that they believe are critical if urban school systems are to be turned around. Business is seen as a potentially valuable partner in the reform movement for at least three reasons. First, business is

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Color of School Reform: Race, Politics, and the Challenge of Urban Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?