Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa, and the Person Within

By Hilde Bruch | Go to book overview

Acknowledgmentis

This book is based on studies that have extended over nearly 40 years and that were possible only through the continuous and active collaboration and support of many. There is probably no one among my professional and personal friends and acquaintances who has not contributed in some form or another. Some shared with me their personal habits, concerns, and secret indulgences; others listened to my efforts to formulate my evolving concepts and confirmed or challenged them. I wish it were possible to acknowledge my gratitude to all of them individually.

My greatest indebtedness is to those who extended to me the use of the clinical and research facilities under their directorship. I wish to express my gratitude to Dr. Rustin McIntosh, Dr. Leo Kanner, Dr. John C. Whitehorn, Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb, Dr. Shervert H. Frazier, and Dr. Alex Pokorny who were in charge of the various services where these studies were carried out, at the College of Physicians and Surgeons ( Columbia University), the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Baylor College of Medicine. I also wish to thank the professional staffs of these institutions for their active help--the nurses, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, and many others, though I shall mention by name only Ms. Grace Touraine who opened up the field of family investigation during the early part of the obesity study, and Ms. Winifred Winikus whose tact and unflagging interest made contact possible, up to the present, with even the most difficult anorexic families.

I wish to acknowledge the contributions of the many physicians who referred their difficult patients for consultation or extended psychotherapy and who reported in detail about their own observations. It would be impossible to be complete, and I apologize to those whose names are not mentioned; their contribution is not valued any the less. I record here only the names of those whose information on individual patients' background or treatment histories has been used in the text, though in a disguised form, and express my thanks to Drs. Henry Aranow, Jr., Anny Baumann, Har

-vii-

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Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa, and the Person Within
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part I - General Aspects 1
  • 1 - Orientation and Point of View 8
  • 2 - Historical and Sociocultural Perspectives 23
  • 3 - Biological Basis of Eating Disorders 42
  • 4 - Hunger Awareness and Individuation 64
  • 5 - Family Frame and Transactions 86
  • 6 - Body Image and Self-Awareness 104
  • Part II - Obesity 107
  • 7 - Diversity of Clinical Pictures 132
  • 8 - Obesity in Childhood 150
  • 9 - Obesity in Adolescence 174
  • 10 - Obesity and Schizophrenia 193
  • 11 - Thin Fat People 208
  • Part III - Anorexia Nervosa 209
  • 12 227
  • 13 250
  • 14 - Primary Anorexia Nervosa 284
  • 15 - Anorexia Nervosa in the Male 304
  • Part IV - Treatment 307
  • 16 - The Practical and Psychological Aspects of Weight Change 333
  • 18 - Outcome and Outlook 387
  • Index 389
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