Writing the American Classics

By James Barbour; Tom Quirk | Go to book overview

WRITING THE
AMERICAN
CLASSICS

EDITED BY

James Barbour and Tom Quirk

The University of North Carolina Press
Chapel Hill and London

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Writing the American Classics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Writing the American Classics *
  • In Memory of Leon Howard Friend, Teacher, Scholar *
  • Contents *
  • James Barbour and Tom Quirk Introduction ix
  • Writing the American Classics *
  • J. A. Leo Lemay Lockean Realities and Olympian Perspectives: the Writing of Franklin's Autobiography 1
  • Notes 19
  • Works Cited 22
  • James Barbour "All My Books Are Botches": Melville's Struggle with the Whale 25
  • Notes 49
  • Works Cited 50
  • Robert Sattelmeyer the Remaking of Walden 53
  • Notes 76
  • Works Cited 77
  • Tom Quirk Nobility Out of Tatters: the Writing of Huckleberry Finn 79
  • Notes 101
  • Works Cited 104
  • James Woodress the Composition of the Professor's House 106
  • Notes 122
  • Works Cited 123
  • William Balassi Hemingway's Greatest Iceberg: the Composition of the Sun Also Rises 125
  • Notes 150
  • Works Cited 153
  • Sally Wolff and David Minter a "Matchless Time": Faulkner and the Writing of the Sound and the Fury 156
  • Notes 174
  • Works Cited 175
  • Scott Donaldson a Short History of Tender is the Night 177
  • Notes 204
  • Works Cited 206
  • KENETH KINNAMON How Native Son Was Born 209
  • Notes 228
  • Works Cited 231
  • Louis OWENS the Mirror and the Vamp: Invention, Reflection, and Bad, Bad Cathy Trask in East of Eden 235
  • Notes 256
  • Works Cited 257
  • T O M Quirk Afterword 258
  • Notes 271
  • Works Cited 271
  • Contributors 273
  • Index 277
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