Ambiguity and Deterrence: British Nuclear Strategy, 1945-1964

By John Baylis | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 13
Chiefs of Staff Committee/
Joint Planning Staff
US and UK Studies of the Use of
Tactical Nuclear Weapons

DEFE 4/157
JP NOTE 26/63
15th August 1963

LIMITED DISTRIBUTION


Introduction
1. Representatives of the Special Studies Group, Chairman United States Joint Chiefs of Staff, and of the United Kingdom Joint Planning Staff met together in London on 12th through 15th August 1963 to discuss the studies prepared by each on the Use of Tactical Nuclear Weapons. This Report sets out the main points of agreement and disagreement identified in the two studies, with particular reference to the issues which it had been determined, in the agreed Terms of Reference of the studies, to address.
The Role and Purpose to be Served by
Tactical Nuclear Weapons

Deterrence
2. United States View. The United States define the primary deterrent roles of tactical nuclear weapons as:--
A. To deter the Soviet Bloc from initiating large-scale nonnuclear warfare on land or at sea by providing a readily evident and credible tactical nuclear back-up to NATO non-nuclear forces. This includes deterrence of a massive Soviet Bloc nonnuclear build-up in Europe which might overwhelm NATO.
B. To deter the Soviet Bloc from initiating warfare at the tactical nuclear level.
C. To contribute to deterring general war.

-435-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ambiguity and Deterrence: British Nuclear Strategy, 1945-1964
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 495

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.