The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History

By Norma Broude; Mary D. Garrard | Go to book overview

INDEX
NOTE: Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
Abbema, Louise, 214
Abstract Expressionism, 239-40, 347, 349, 350, 420, 428, 467
Abstraction (O'Keeffe), 444, 445
Abstract No. 2 (Krasner), 430, 430
Academy at Rome, 211
Adam, Juliette Lambert, 272, 301, 303, 308
Adam, Paul, 285
Adhémar, Hélène, 275
Admiration (Degas), 288
Adoration of the Magi (da Vinci), 64
Aeneas, 165, 165
African art, 471
Afrofemcentrism, 18-19, 475-84
Agrippina with the Ashes of Germanicus (West), 166, 168
Aha Oe Feii? (Are You Jealous?, Gauguin), 340, 340
Alain of Lille, 68
Alberti, Leon Battista, 44, 45, 47, 71, 88, 94, 95, 107, 367
Albums: as feminine art, 13, 20, 172-80; forms of, 172-76; and liberal femininism, 20; prevalence of, 171-76; purpose of, 184; and social experience, 176-80. See also Feminine imagery
Alciati, Andrea, 146
Alcoff, Linda, 5
Aline and Pierre pictures (Renoir), 231, 304, 307, 308
Allegory of the Marriage Alliance Between France and Spain (anon.), 147, 147
Allen, Esther, 420
Alpers, Svetlana, 92, 149
Altieri, Marco Antonio, 105-6, 144
Amateur art: and the carte-de-visite, 179; and the family, 180, 181-82; and high art, 171-72, 182-84; prevalence of, 13, 171-76, 184; and self/other, 178; and social experience, 176-80. See also Albums
Amateur photography, 194-95, 200
Amaury-Duval, Eugène-Emmanuel, 335, 335
Amazon, 463
Amelioration Society, 272, 276
American Artists' Congress, 420
The American Dream (Ringgold), 468, 471, 472
American People series (Ringgold), 468. See also specific work
Americans on the Move (Anderson), 489-90
Amymone (mythological figure), 141
Ancien Culte mahorie (Gauguin), 326, 328, 339
Anderson, Laurie, 489-90
Anderson Galleries, 440
Angela Davis (Ringgold), 473
Animals, 11-12, 14, 19, 64, 116, 165, 187-201, 224
Anna Klumpke at Work (Bonheur), 194-95, 195
Anne of Austria, 151
Anne of Cleves, 49
Antea (Parmigianino), 66
Anthony, Susan B., 453, 464
Apelles, 96
Apollonio di Giovanni, 106
Après le Bain (Degas), 282
Aquinas, Thomas, 31, 107
Aragon, Louis, 363, 371-72
Ara Pacis Augustae, 163, 165
Aretino, Pietro, 50
Are You Jealous? (Aha Oe Feii?, Gauguin), 340, 340
Aristotle, 69-70, 71, 73-74, 87, 88
Armenini, Giovanni Battista, 87, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, 97
The Arrival of Agrippina at Brundisium with the Ashes of Germanicus (West), 166, 167, 168
Art: goal of, 220; and mechanics, 390; tricked by, 95, 96. See also Amateur art; High art
Artists: Man and Wife (exhibition), 426, 431
Artists: courtesans compared with, 65, 96-97; as divine creators, 367-68; as flâneurs, 253-54, 255, 259, 261; gifts/talent of, 392-94; intentions of, 20-21; marriage of, 93; relationships with women of men artists, 92-93. See also Professional women artists; specific artist
Artists' Union, 420
Artists on the WPA (Soyer), 408, 410
L'Art féminin, 13-14, 207-24
L'Art français (journal), 207-9, 208, 211, 214, 215
Art of This Century (gallery), 442
Ashton, Dore, 188, 196
Aspasia, 463
Assunta (Titian), 115
Atlanta Children (Ringgold), 18, 484
At the Opera (Cassatt), 244, 257
Auclert, Hubertine, 273-74, 278, 301, 303
Augustus, 162-63, 164
Aurelio, Nicolo. See Sacred and Profane Love (Titian)
Aurevilly, Barbey d', 304
Aurier, Albert, 314
Austen, Alice, 195, 196
Autoportrait avec chapeau (Gauguin), 313
Autoportrait près de Colgotha (Gauguin), 313
Author is dead, 2, 4, 17, 20
Avant et après (Gauguin), 328
Avant la Séance (Carpentier), 206
Avery, Charles, 133
Avicenna, 69
Aztec art, 17, 397-405
Bachofen, J. J., 461
Bacon, Peggy, 350, 414, 414
Bagarotto, Laura. See Sacred and Profane Love (Titian)
Baigell, Matthew, 420
Baigneuses (Courbet), 335
The Baker's Wife (Degas), 285, 287
Bakhtin, Mikhail, 220
Baldini, Umberto, 101
Baldovinetti, Alesso, 46, 46
Ball at the Opera (Manet), 234
Ballu, Roger, 218
Bal Tabarin dancer (Severini), 348
Balthus (Klossowski of Rola), 350
Banana Men (Dwight), 417, 418

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.