The Army and Economic Mobilization

By R. Elberton Smith | Go to book overview
Page
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE AND GUIDE TO FOOTNOTES718
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS721
INDEX729

Tables
No.
1. Budget Expenditures of U.S. Government, 1 July 1940-31 August 19454
2. U.S. War Program For World War II: By Procuring Agency, 1 July 1940-31 August 19456
3. U.S. War Program For World War II: By Major Categories, 1 July 1940-31 August 19457
4. Ordnance Department: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 July 1940-31 December 19459
5. Quartermaster Corps: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 July 1940-31 August 194514
6. Signal Corps: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 January 1940-31 December 194518
7. Medical Department: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 January 1940-31 December 194521
8. Corps of Engineers: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 January 1942-31 December 194523
9. Transportation Corps: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 January 1942-31 December 194525
10. Chemical Warfare Service: Procurement Deliveries of Selected Major Items, 1 January 1940-31 December 194526
11. Army Air Forces: Procurement Deliveries of Airplanes, January 1940- December27
12. Number of Manufacturing Facilities Allocated or Reserved, Summary for Specified Years, 1923-194158
13. Distribution of Allocations and Planned Procurement Load: By Army Supply Arms and Services, 1 January 193859
14. Geographical Distribution of Planned Procurement Load, Data as of 18 February 193860
15. First Educational Orders Program, Fiscal Year 193963
16. Strength of Army and National Guard, 1920-1945122
17. Munitions Program of 30 June 1940132
18. Army Supply Program, Section I: Army Ground Forces Requirements in Successive Editions of ASP152

-xxii-

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