The Army and Economic Mobilization

By R. Elberton Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV Industrial Mobilization Planning

Development of the Industrial Mobilization Plan

Industrial mobilization planning, as the term had come to be used by the end of the 1920's, concerned all activities which would be necessary to insure the success and minimize the burdens of a wartime procurement program. More specifically, it was designed to insure the availability of all contributory resources--raw materials, labor, power, fuel, transportation, and the like--for the largescale production of munitions, while at the same time maintaining the nation's industrial establishment and supplying essential civilian needs. Planning of this nature envisaged widespread controls over the entire economy--controls which would vitally affect all segments of the population and raise important and delicate questions of national policy in many different areas.

In discharging his industrial mobilization planning responsibilities under the National Defense Act, the Assistant Secretary of War suffered under a number of limitations. He could not assure the preparation of adequate procurement plans by the Navy and other agencies external to the War Department, and it was not until the early 1930's that estimates of the Navy's wartime needs began to become available as a basis for industrial mobilization planning. Moreover, in time of emergency or war the actual execution of the broad plans for industrial mobilization--in contrast to the specific procurement plans--would not be the responsibility of the War Department. Throughout most of the planning period it was taken for granted that general controls over the entire economy would be exercised by one or more specially created wartime superagencies operating under civilian administrator's appointed by the President. The Assistant Secretary was thus obligated to make industrial mobilization plans for someone else to carry out in time of war. The many doubts as to the nature and number of wartime superagencies, and the extent to which they would adopt the plans prepared by OASW, threw a cloud of uncertainty over the whole planning operation.

Another difficulty faced by OASW throughout much of the planning period was the prevailing climate of public indifference or actual hostility toward measures of any kind which could be described as "preparation for war." The failure of World War I to create a lasting peace, widespread discussion of the costs and causes of the war, assignment of war guilt to "munitions makers and militarists," and faith in disarmament as the only guarantee of peace were among the many conditions which characterized the aftermath of that war. Coupled with these influences were the seeming remoteness of American involvement in any future war and the general preoccupation with peacetime pursuits in the

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Army and Economic Mobilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 749

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.