Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women's Literature

By Leslie Bow | Go to book overview

Notes

Author's Note: All book reviews, interviews, personal communications, newspaper and magazine articles, and miscellaneous popular media sources have been cited in the text or discursive endnotes.


Chapter One
1
Fluxus originated as an avant-gardist art movement in the 1960s, a loose affiliation of international musicians, visual artists, and poets who were known for staging “Events” or performance art pieces involving audience participation or task-oriented activities. Ono's association with the Fluxus movement began in 1960 and included a concert of performance events at Carnegie Recital Hall in 1961.
2
This is not to say that hostility against her no longer exists; see, for example, the oddly anachronistic website, “Me Against Yoko Ono,” inviting surfers to logon if they agree that Ono broke up the Beatles. The site is subtitled, “Yoko Ono: She's everywhere you don't want her to be.” http://www toptown.com/ DORMS/SGT.PEPPE/yoko.htm
3
Ono cited in Barbara Haskell and John G. Hanhardt, Yoko Ono: Arias and Objects (Salt Lake City: Peregrine Smith, 1991), 5. Lennon cited in Jonathan Cott and Christine Doudna et. al., The Ballad of John and Yoko (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1982), 115.
4
See Jon Wiener's “John Lennon Versus the FBI.” Jon Wiener, Professors, Politics and Pop (London: Verso, 1991). The INS concentrated its efforts on deporting John Lennon in the summer of 1972 out of fear that he would hold a political rally to disrupt the Republican National Convention where Nixon was to be renominated. Wiener notes that Lennon's application for permanent residency would be approved in 1975, after it was conceded that such targeting was part of the Nixon administration's obsession with New Left activism. See also Jerry Hopkins, Yoko Ono (New York: Macmillan, 1986).
5
Other comments were more direct, as in Paul's, George's, and Ringo's purported jokes about Ono being the “Jap Flavor of the Month” and having a slanted vagina (Hopkins 1986, 80).
6
For the history behind the arrest of Tokyo Rose, see Harry T. Brundidge, “Okinawa Deal Led War Correspondents to ‘Tokyo Rose' Find: Brundidge, Lee Reach Jap Capital Before Occupation; Quiz Radio Siren,” Nashville Tennessean, 9 May 1948, 1. Cited in Nathaniel Weyl, Treason: The Story of Disloyalty and Betrayal in American History (Washington, D.C.: Public Affairs Press, 1950), 387. Cited in Russell Warren Howe, The Hunt for ‘Tokyo Rose' (Lanham: Madison Books, 1989), xvii. See Masayo Duus, Tokyo Rose, Orphan of the Pacific, trans. Peter Duus (New York: Harper and Row, 1979), 12, and Stanley I. Kutler, “Forging a Legend: The Treason of ‘Tokyo Rose,'” Reprinted in Asian Ameri

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