John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control

By Joseph Hamburger | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I WELCOME this opportunity to express my gratitude for the award of a fellowship by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where the writing of this book began in 1992; and for the fellowships in support of the research for the book from the Earhart Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

I have greatly benefited from comments and criticisms made by friends and colleagues. I especially appreciate informative and stimulating conversations about particular aspects of the book with Frank Turner, Steven Smith, and Victor Gourevitch. I am also grateful to Geoffrey W. Smith for carefully reading the entire manuscript and making many helpful suggestions. In addition, I am glad to acknowledge the always generous help, including illuminating observations, from Ann and Jack Robson. Among others who have been helpful are the necessarily anonymous readers whose reports to publishers included welcome encouragement and useful criticism. I have also greatly benefited from critical comments and stimulating discussion by colleagues in the Political Theory Workshop at Yale University and by participants in a colloquium on Mill's On Liberty held at Aspen in 1989 and sponsored by Liberty Fund. Of course, none of these persons is responsible for any errors of fact or judgment, nor do they necessarily agree with my conclusions.

I especially wish to thank Mrs. Ruth Muessig for once again mediating between me and the word processor and for displaying superhuman patience and tolerance in face of what must have seemed my endless alterations.

I also record my gratitude to the following institutions for permission to quote from manuscripts in their collections: the British Library; the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics; the College Archives, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London; Jagiellonian University Library; the National Library of Scotland; the Pierpont Morgan Library; the Public Record Office; Statni Oblastni Archiv Litomerice; the Masters and Fellows of Trinity College Cambridge; University of Birmingham Library; University College London; and University of London.

Early formulations of some of the argument of this book appeared in “Religion and On Liberty,” in A Cultivated Mind: Essays on J. S. Mill Presented to John M. Robson, ed. Michael Laine (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1991); “How Liberal Was John Stuart Mill?” (Austin: Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, 1991), reprinted in Adventures with Britannia: Personalities, Politics and Culture in Britain, ed.

-xix-

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John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • John Stuart Mill on Liberty and Control *
  • Chapter One - Liberty and Control 3
  • Chapter Two - Cultural Reform 18
  • Chapter Three - Mill and Christianity 42
  • Chapter Four - Candor or Concealment 55
  • Chapter Five - Arguments about Christianity in on Liberty 86
  • Chapter Six - The Religion of Humanity 108
  • Chapter Seven - Individuality and Moral Reform 149
  • Chapter Eight - How Much Liberty? 166
  • Chapter Nine - Mill's Rhetoric 203
  • Epilogue 225
  • Index 235
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