Descartes' Method of Doubt

By Janet Broughton | Go to book overview

References

Annas, Julia, and Jonathan Barnes, eds. 1985. The Modes of Scepticism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Arnauld, Antoine, and Pierre Nicole. 1996. Logic or the Art of Thinking. Edited and translated by Jill Vance Buroker. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ayers, Michael. 1991. Locke: Epistemology and Ontology. London: Routledge.

Beck, Leslie John. 1952. The Method of Descartes: A Study of the “Regulae.” Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bennett, Jonathan. 1984. A Study of Spinoza's “Ethics.” [Indianapolis, Ind.]: Hackett Publishing Company.

Beyssade, Jean-Marie. 1992. “The Idea of God and the Proofs of His Existence.” In The Cambridge Companion to Descartes, edited by John Cottingham, 174–99. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brandom, Robert. 1997. “Study Guide.” Afterword to Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind, by Wilfred Sellars. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Broughton, Janet. 1977. “Aspects of Descartes's Conception of Causation.” Ph.D. diss., Princeton University.

Broughton, Janet. 1984. “Skepticism and the Cartesian Circle.” Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (4): 593–615.

Broughton, Janet. 1986. “Adequate Causes and Natural Change in Descartes's Philosophy.” In Human Nature and Natural Knowledge, edited by Alan Donagan, Anthony N. Perovich, Jr., and Michael V. Wedin, 107–27. Dordrecht: D. Reidel.

Broughton, Janet. 1999. “The Method of Doubt.” In The Rationalists: Critical Essays on Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, edited by Derk Pereboom, 1–18. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Broughton, Janet. Forthcoming. “Dreamers and Madmen.” In The History of Early Modern Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Margaret Wilson, edited by Christia Mercer and Eileen O'Neill. Oxford: Blackwell.

Burnyeat, Myles. 1982. “Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed.” Philosophical Review 91 (1): 3–40.

Burnyeat, Myles. 1983. “Can the SkepticLive His Skepticism?” In The Skeptical Tradition, edited by Myles Burnyeat, 117–48. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Burnyeat, Myles. 1997. “The Sceptic in His Place and Time.” In The Original Sceptics: A Controversy, edited by Myles Burnyeat and Michael Frede, 92–126. Indianapolis, Ind.: Hackett.

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Descartes' Method of Doubt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Descartes's Method of Doubt *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Descartes's Method of Doubt *
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Raising Doubt *
  • Chapter 1 - Who is Doubting? 21
  • Chapter 2 - Ancient Skepticism 33
  • Chapter 3 - Reasons for Suspending Judgment 42
  • Chapter 4 - Reasons for Doubt 62
  • Chapter 5 - Common Sense and Skeptical Reflection 72
  • Part Two - Using Doubt *
  • Chapter 6 - Using Doubt 97
  • Chapter 7 - Inner Conditions 108
  • Chapter 8 - Outer Conditions 144
  • Chapter 9 - Reflections 175
  • References 203
  • Index 211
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