Descartes' Method of Doubt

By Janet Broughton | Go to book overview

Index
Academica (Cicero), 13, 13n.13, 33n, 36n, 43n.2
Academic skepticism, 13, 13n.13; on common sense, 78, 81–82; as criticism of Stoic epistemology, 33–37, 49n.12, 68, 72–73, 81–82; on dreaming, 36–37, 40– 41, 68, 75–76, 77–78, 81–82, 89; andsuspense of judgment, 37, 60–61. See also ancient skepticism
Adam, Charles, 103n.4
Against the Logicians (Sextus Empiricus), 34n, 35n.4, 36nn, 39n.12, 72n
agnostics, 67, 67n. See also atheists
ancient skepticism: assent/judgment as focus of, 33–34, 60–61; vs. Cartesian dream argument, 68, 68nn.11–12, 75– 76; Descartes's familiarity with, 33n; dream/lunacy arguments of, 66, 66n; rehashedin First Meditation, 42–43, 43n.1, 43n.4. See also Academic skepticism; Pyrrhonian skepticism
angels, 69n, 167–68n, 173–74, 174n, 201
Annas, Julia, 68n.12
Archimedes, 108, 177, 178
Arnauld, Antoine: on the Cartesian Circle, 175–76; Logic, 3n.4, 114n.8, 179–80; on mind/body dualism, 126, 126n, 127–28, 130
assent. See maxim for assent; suspense of judgment
atheists, 9, 10, 67, 67n
Augustine, Saint, 43n.1, 147n
Ayers, Michael, 44n.5
Barnes, Jonathan, 68n.12
Beyssde, Jean-Marie, 149n
body, conception of, 121–23, 171–72, 172n.36
Bourdin, Pierre, 176n, 196n
bracketing beliefs, 54–61, 55n
Brandom, Robert, 137
Burman, Frans, 14, 42, 151–52
Burnyeat, Myles, 39–40n.14, 43n.3, 90–92, 91nn
Carriero, John, 26, 27, 121n.16, 128n.25, 139n, 183n.5, 198n
Cartesian Circle, 175–86; Arnauldon, 175–76; andcausal principles, 177–78; andcer tainty/indubitability about “I exist,” 177–78, 180–81, 185; andclear and distinct ideas, 179–80, 181–84, 182n, 185–86; andthe deceiving God argument, 179, 180, 181–86; Gewirth on, 183–84, 186; Mersenne on, 175, 176; BernardW illiams on, 184, 186
causal principles, 144–45, 153–70; adequacy principle, 2, 155–58, 157n.15, 160–62, 256n.11; and Aristotelian distinction among types of causes, 156n.14; andthe Cartesian Circle, 177– 78; a cause must have at least as much reality as its effect, 154, 158–60; the cause of an idea has at least as much formal reality as the idea has objective reality, 2, 154, 158–61, 160n, 170, 170n.33; certainty/indubitability of, 162–64; ex nihilo principle (something cannot come from nothing), 154–55, 154n.9, 156, 157n.15, 158n.17, 162, 164; vs. logical principles, 163–64, 163n. See also sufficient reason, principle of
Cavell, Stanley, 78n
certainty/indubitability, 99–100; absolute certainty, 97–98; of causal principles, 162–64; andconfiict among certainties, 51; doubts ruled out by, 8; doubts vs., 48, 49, 49n; of the ex nihilo principle, 164; of “I exist,” 105, 106, 112, 117, 123–24, 128n.25 (see also cogito passage); of mathematical claims, 104; moral certainty, 63, 78–79, 79n; moral

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Descartes' Method of Doubt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Descartes's Method of Doubt *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Descartes's Method of Doubt *
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Raising Doubt *
  • Chapter 1 - Who is Doubting? 21
  • Chapter 2 - Ancient Skepticism 33
  • Chapter 3 - Reasons for Suspending Judgment 42
  • Chapter 4 - Reasons for Doubt 62
  • Chapter 5 - Common Sense and Skeptical Reflection 72
  • Part Two - Using Doubt *
  • Chapter 6 - Using Doubt 97
  • Chapter 7 - Inner Conditions 108
  • Chapter 8 - Outer Conditions 144
  • Chapter 9 - Reflections 175
  • References 203
  • Index 211
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