After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars

By G. John Ikenberry | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
VARIETIES OF ORDER: BALANCE OF POWER,
HEGEMONIC, AND CONSTITUTIONAL

IT IS widely agreed that domestic and international politics are rooted in very different types of order. Domestic politics is the realm of shared iden/ tity, stable institutions, and legitimate authority, whereas international pol/ itics is, as one realist scholar recently put it, a “brutal arena where states look for opportunities to take advantage of each other, and therefore have little reason to trust each other.”1 In the most influential formulation, the two realms have fundamentally different structures: one based on the prin/ ciple of hierarchy and the other on anarchy.2

But are the two realms really so dissimilar? Both domestic and interna/ tional order can take many different forms. In some countries, politics can be extremely ruthless and coercive, whereas some areas of international politics are remarkably consensual and institutionalized. Seemingly stable and legitimate polities, such as the United States in the mid-nineteenth century, can rupture into bloody civil war, and countries within Western Europe and the North Atlantic region have created a highly stable and integrated political order over the last high century, in which armed vio/ lence is largely unthinkable. The most useful insight might be that both realms of politics—domestic and international—face similar problems in the creation and maintenance of order, and the solutions that emerge are often different but sometimes similar.

Across the great historical junctures, leading states have adopted differ/ ent strategies for coping with the uncertainties and disparities of postwar power and, as a result, have built different types of postwar orders. Varia/ tions in the extent to which leading states attempted to built order around binding institutions are manifest in the divergent order-building efforts of Britain in 1815 and the United States in 1919 and 1945. Thus the central empirical concern in the historical case studies in this book is with the policies and actions of these states relating to the reorganization of postwar relations among the major states. In what way and to what extent did these leading states advance institutional strategies for establishing restraints and

____________________
1
John Mearsheimer, “The False Promise of International Institutions,” International Secu/ rity, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Winter 1994/95), p. 9.
2
Kenneth Waltz, Theory of International Politics (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979).

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 293

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.