Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities

By Stephen D. Krasner | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Coit D. Blacker is deputy director and senior fellow at Stanford University's Institute for International Studies. During the first Clinton administration, he served as special assistant to the president for National Security Affairs and senior director for Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

John Boli is professor of sociology at Emory University. A native Californian and graduate of Stanford University, he has published extensively on the topics of world culture and global organizations, education, citizenship, and state power and authority in the world polity. His books include The Globalization Reader, Constructing World Culture: International Nongovernmental Organizations Since 1875, and Institutional Structure: Constituting State, Society, and the Individual. His current projects include a book on the origins, structuration, and consequences of world culture since 1850, and a longitudinal study of the impact of world-cultural trends on transnational corporations.

Thomas C. Heller is the Shelton Professor of International Legal Studies at Stanford University Law School and senior fellow at Stanford University's Institute for International Studies. He currently writes about and teaches international and comparative economic law, legal theory, and law and political economic development. His principal preoccupation for the past seven years has been the evolution of international environmental regimes, both as a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and as a lawyer

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 367

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.