Where Are All the Young Men and Women of Color?: Capacity Enhancement Practice in the Criminal Justice System

By Melvin Delgado | Go to book overview

10
Experimental Gallery,
Children's Museum,
Seattle, Washington

Programs such as the Experimental Gallery owe their inception to many different people. However, they are usually the brainchild of one in particular. In this case, that person was Ms. Susan Warner, who is currently the curator of education at the Children's Museum in Seattle, Washington. Warner developed a link between the work and activities associated with museum exhibit development and their potential to reach out to and engage youth. Multidisciplinary, experiential, and teamoriented activities can have a place in work with youth, just as they do in the development of exhibits. Rehabilitation of youth requires the collaboration and involvement of many different areas, community being one:

The institutions in which these young people are housed employ many dedicated and wonderful people. The responsibility for these young people lies, however, with all of us. It is unrealistic to expect the institutions to rehabilitate youth without community support and real involvement. The Experimental Gallery serves as one such example. We believe that some of these young people are talented, and could potentially become contributing members of our society. For them it should never be too late. In this program, we therefore choose to focus our efforts in the arena of juvenile justice. We work with kids who have gone astray rather

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