Where Are All the Young Men and Women of Color?: Capacity Enhancement Practice in the Criminal Justice System

By Melvin Delgado | Go to book overview

18
Reflections on the
Case Studies

The programs highlighted through the case studies illustrate a wide range of types, settings, missions, and goals. However, they all seek to use capacity enhancement principles and strategies to achieve their mission. Each program brings an innovative and highly relevant service to the field of correctional supervision, yet they all highlight the importance of identifying and tapping some aspect of capacity enhancement in the structure and delivery of services. Some of these programs do their work within prison walls, probably the most challenging setting in which to undertake capacity enhancement practice; others take place in various community-based settings and involve both youth and adults, men as well as women. Regardless of setting, these programs illustrate for the practitioner the potential of believing in the abilities of offenders, their families, and communities.

The individual stories reported as part of each case study bring a needed dimension to the study—namely, the importance of individuals in bringing the concept of capacity enhancement to life. The individual stories also highlight the ripple effect of capacity enhancement interventions—significant others, families, and communities all benefit by unleashing the potential of ex-offenders. The case studies also serve the important function of grounding this book in the operative reality of dayto-day practice. The cases, as a result, effectively serve to prevent this book

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