Classical Inspiration in Medieval Art

By Walter Oakeshott | Go to book overview

LIST OF ILLUSTRATION
Roma figures used for centuries B.C., Arabic for centuries A.D.
PLATE I High lights and shadows in antique painting, and treatment suggesting the third dimension.
(a) Tragic Actors -- wall painting in the Naples Museum, from Herculaneum: 1st century.
(b) Apollo and Daphne -- wall painting in the Naples Museum, from Pompeii: 1st century.
(c) Column from a canon table; in a Bible fragment from Canterbury: 8th century. British Museum, Royal MS. I E vi.
(d) Typical detail from later medieval canon table ( 12th century), Winchester Cathedral. MS. of Zacharias Chrysopolitanus.
PLATE 2 Contrast between modelled and linear treatment in mosaic.
(a) Mosaic on the triumphal arch in S. Praxed's Church, Rome: 9th century.
(b) Mosaic in the apse of the church of SS. Cosmas and Damian, Rome: 6th century.
PLATE 3 Use of small tesserae in mosaic to imitate painting techniques.
(a) Detail from a mosaic in the Naples Museum, from Pompeii, being a copy of a painting of the late IVth century, representing Alexander at the Battle of Issus.
(b) Prophet, with a background of arabesques -- mosaic from the Orthodox Baptistry, Ravenna: 5th century. Notice the painter-like treatment of head and arm.
PLATE 4 Contrast between modelled and linear treatment in mosaic.
(a) From the dome of the Orthodox Baptistry at Ravenna. In the roundel, Christ baptized by John (the head of Christ and the head and arm of John heavily restored and altered); the half figure is the river god Jordan. Below, apostles carrying crowns: 5th century.
(b) From the dome of the Arian Baptishy at Ravenna. Subject as in (a): early 6th century. Note the use of a precise bounding line, and the much less painter-like and more linear treatment of faces and draperies.
PLATE 5 Classical painting in linear style.
Girl pouring perfume from a jug -- wall painting, early 1st century, perhaps after a Greek original of the early IVth century. Rome, Museo Nazionale delle Terme.

-113-

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Classical Inspiration in Medieval Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • I - Classical Origins 1
  • II - The Northumbrian Renaissance And Its Background 22
  • III - The Carolingian Renaissance 41
  • IV - The Ottonian Renaissance And the Evolution 59
  • V - The Twelfth Century Renaissance (i) 76
  • VI - The Twelfth Century Renaissance Ii 96
  • List of Illustration 113
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Plates *
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